Thursday’s Headlines

  • Not only are New Orleans streets unsafe for — and drivers hostile to — cyclists, but when a driver hits someone on a bike, police are often reluctant to investigate, even when presented with video footage. (Times-Pic)
  • City Journal editor Brian Anderson describes seeing a driver hit and kill a woman in a Washington, D.C. crosswalk. It seems like streets are getting even more dangerous, but “it doesn’t have to be this way,” he writes.
  • Five ways to make city streets friendlier to bikes and scooters: more roundabouts, forcing trucks to make deliveries at night, replacing car parking with scooter and bike parking and (duh) more bike and scooter lanes. (Bloomberg)
  • Cincinnati police are in full victim-blaming mode as they crack down on speeding drivers and distracted pedestrians. (Local 12)
  • A San Francisco study says Uber and Lyft are responsible for half the city’s increase in traffic since 2010. (Tech Crunch)
  • In contrast to many cities, most users of new dockless bike-share programs in Minneapolis and St. Paul seem to be following the rules. (Minn Post)
  • Dockless e-scooter company Bird is trying to get around municipal restrictions by delivering scooters directly to users’ doors. (WTVA)
  • Renew Atlanta, a $250-million program to tackle a backlog of road projects, doesn’t have enough money to get to all the projects on the list. Some, like making Howell Mill Road a complete street, will be scaled back or reprioritized. (Saporta Report)
  • Anti-transit gadfly Randal O’Toole thinks government investment in transit is wasteful, so we should just give people cars. He recently debated transportation consultant Jarrett Walker, who argued that cities need good transit because they can’t accommodate everyone driving. (City Lab)
  • An excerpt from “Building the Bicycling City” describes how the Dutch created an accessible urban biking culture. In rapidly growing Eindhoven, it had more to do with appeasing frustrated motorists by separating slow and fast traffic than encouraging cycling, which remained a popular mode post-World War II. (Next City)
  • The Hillsborough Metropolitan Planning Organization is organizing a “walk of silence” Saturday in memory of the 200 people killed in car crashes in the area each year. (Tampa Bay Times)