Ad Nauseam: Use Any App You Want While Driving — Because Safety!

Here’s the latest in wishful thinking about distracted driving. A new application called “Drivemode” wants to make it easier for you to use all your mobile apps while you’re behind the wheel — but don’t worry it’s safe! Because, at least theoretically, you don’t actually have to look at your phone.

That’s the marketing message in this spot, which goes against study after study demonstrating that even hands-free devices still lead to a dangerous level of distraction while driving. Backed by “entrepreneurs from Zipcar and Tesla Motors along with various industry specialists,” Drivemode is still in beta testing and doesn’t appear to be in imminent danger of lulling millions of motorists into thinking they can safely drive and use Instagram, though it does have some slick marketing and won an obscure award for Android apps in September.

Meanwhile, an AT&T app that goes by a nearly identical name, DriveMode, is actually pretty great. The AT&T app can be set up to automatically respond to texts whenever you’re in motion exceeding 25 mph, with a message that says you’re driving and will respond when it’s safe.

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