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How Does Your State Stack Up on Funding for Walking and Biking?

state_levels
Click to enlarge. Graphic: Alliance for Biking and Walking

How well does your state fund infrastructure for walking and biking? Or perhaps we should say, how poorly?

The Alliance for Biking and Walking put together this handy chart, showing roughly what proportion of each state's federal funding goes toward projects for walking and biking.

Obviously, no state is really rolling out the red carpet for active transportation. While walking and biking account for about 11.5 percent of all trips, on average states devote only 2.1 percent of their federal funding to active modes.

But some states are doing better than others, with Delaware, Florida (which has seen big decreases lately in pedestrian fatalities), and Minnesota topping the list. West Virginia, North Dakota, and South Carolina round out the bottom.

The Alliance cautions that the data, which reflects spending between 2009 and 2012, isn't perfect. For example, if your state builds highways with bike infrastructure on the side, that expenditure might not be included in this total.

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