Businesses in Groningen, the Netherlands: More Bike Traffic, Please


What happens when transportation planners try to accommodate cyclist traffic? If you’re in Groningen, the Netherlands, where over half of all trips are made by bike, you get complaints from business owners — who don’t want cyclists diverted from their street.

David Hembrow of A View From the Cycle Path says students are flooding the Zonnelaan bike path to Zernike Campus, leading planners to recommend alternate “smart routes,” which are separated from autos and have no traffic lights. Some merchants along the Zonnelaan path aren’t having it. Hembrow explains the video:

The first person interviewed says that when he started his business 25 years ago research showed that 10000 cyclists per day were using the Zonnelaan route. That’s why they located there. The number of cyclists past his door has more than doubled since they started the business. Like other business owners on the route, he’s disappointed that the local government is redirecting passing traffic away from his door as this could result in less business. The local government has organised a meeting to try to address these concerns.

In the Netherlands, shopkeepers like cyclists.

A TV news spot where the “man on the street” complains that there aren’t enough bikes. Has the world gone topsy-turvy?

Also today: Reflections — or laments — on U.S. train station design at The Urbanophile and Second Avenue Sagas. Treehugger wonders how China can make trucks safer for cyclists and pedestrians while Canada and the States can’t afford it. BikeWalkLee Blog has an update from Florida, where the Lee County MPO has adopted a street safety plan. And Baltimore Spokes links to a report that says America’s standard crosswalk is “essentially not visible” to motorists.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Research Bolsters Case for Cycle Tracks While AASHTO Updates Guide

|
For decades, dueling camps of cycling advocates have feuded about how to best accommodate riders. Some have pushed for the construction of Dutch-style cycle tracks, arguing that separated lanes make bicycling safer and less intimidating, while others have insisted such infrastructure isolates riders and makes cycling more dangerous than simply remaining within the flow of […]

America Could Have Been Building Protected Bike Lanes for the Last 40 Years

|
Salt Lake City is on track to implement the nation’s first “protected intersection” — a Dutch-inspired design to minimize conflicts between cyclists and drivers at crossings. For American cities, this treatment feels like the cutting edge, but a look back at the history of bike planning in the United States reveals that even here, this idea is far from new. In fact, […]

How Vancouver Designs Intersections With Bike Lanes to Minimize Conflicts

|
For the last installment of our series previewing the Pro-Walk Pro-Bike Pro-Place conference, which starts Monday in Pittsburgh, I talked to Jerry Dobrovolny, transportation director of the city of Vancouver, BC, about how the city designs intersections where there are protected bike lanes. (The interview has been lightly edited for clarity and length.) Members of his […]

How Should Streetcars and Bikes Interact?

|
Streetcar service could finally begin this year in Washington, DC. Trial runs are already taking place. And the debate about how people on bikes will navigate the tracks is already raging. Last week, the District Department of Transportation quietly proposed streetcar regulations that would ban bicycling within a streetcar guideway except to cross the street. Most immediately, […]