Skip to Content
Streetsblog USA home
Streetsblog USA home
Log In
Streetsblog.net

Which States Do the Most (and the Least) to Support Biking and Walking?

11:17 AM EDT on June 29, 2012

The transportation bill is upon us -- and with it came some bad news for people who want to make streets safer for biking and walking. Not only does the bill reduce the overall amount of dedicated funding for programs like Safe Routes to School, it allows states to transfer some of these funds to other uses.

Which makes advocating for safer streets at the state level all the more important. Today, Matt Wempe of the League of American Bicyclists brings us a look at how states put their funding for biking and walking to use:

The League compiled federal bike/ped funding data reported by the states from 2007-11 (the data doesn’t separate out bicycles and pedestrians). We used this data to get a better picture of which states prioritize bike/ped projects that create transportation choices, make sure kids get to school safely, reduce congestion, improve air quality, and make our streets safer for everyone.

false

If your state is on this list, now is the time to ensure it continues to dedicate resources to bicycling and walking. If your state does not appear on this list, it is more important than ever to make the case for bicycling and walking to your governor and department of transportation. We are here to help with that.

The League has posted a comprehensive spreadsheet showing how all 50 states rank on investment in safe streets. The document not only includes what each state spends from dedicated pots of money like Transportation Enhancements, but also what they spend on bike/ped using the much larger pot of flexible funds in the Surface Transportation Program. Scanning the document, the overall laggards include Texas, Michigan, South Carolina, and, surprisingly, Maryland.

Elsewhere on the Network today: Seattle Bike Blog reports on the results of a Canadian study that examined how roundabouts affect cyclist safety. Grid Chicago asks whether the city really needs to spend $45 million to build a "flyover" to move cyclists and pedestrians around congestion at Navy Pier. And Walkable Dallas Fort Worth posits that Stockton, California's recent bankruptcy may have had something to due with its reckless sprawl-based growth.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog USA

Tuesday’s Headlines Look for a Home

The federal government could help families save money by providing more funding for housing near transit.

March 5, 2024

All The Ways That Car Domination Harms Our Communities (Well, Almost All…)

A new study seeks to quantify everything car culture costs us. Yet there are still more ways that auto-centrism hurts us all.

March 5, 2024

California Launches New Transportation Equity Tool

The Transportation Equity Index maps out crash rates and creates a new way to map out multimodal access.

March 4, 2024

Understanding Car Culture ‘Denialism’ Can Help Safety Advocates Respond

Opponents of change sow confusion with fake experts, logical fallacies, impossible expectations (moving goalposts), conspiracy theories, and selectivity (cherry picking). We can fight back.

March 4, 2024

PROWAG Can Make Cities More Accessible — So Here’s What You Need to Know

America has waited more than 12 years for the Public Right-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines to be implemented. Here's why they matter.

March 4, 2024
See all posts