Today’s Headlines

  • Following on the heels of PBS’ well-reviewed Detroit documentary, a new
    short film (above) envisions a new transportation future for the Motor
    City (America 2050 Blog)
  • Rep. Blumenauer, head of Congress’ livable communities task force, fights the loss of momentum for climate legislation with a call for more investments in clean transportation (Politico)
  • A vehicle miles traveled tax is looking increasingly like the future of transportation financing … so how could such a new system work? (WaPo)
  • Green groups starting to warn that electric cars aren’t the panacea they’ve been marketed as (The Hindu)
  • A report from the annual Seattle smart growth conference, where Obama administration officials rolled out some big plans and the simple act of walking got a lot of notice (Grist)
  • Surface transportation companies, particularly freight rail, still struggling to get back on track after this weekend’s Mid-Atlantic blizzard (JOC)
  • Houston’s new mayor considers dropping transit fares, even to zero, in order to boost ridership (Chronicle)

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Apple Transportation Program Stuck in the Past

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It’s Time to Stop Pretending That Roads Pay for Themselves

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