Friday’s Headlines Herald the Weekend

  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration may impose higher penalties on automakers that don’t meet gas mileage requirements. Those standards had been postponed by the Trump administration. (Reuters)
  • Environmental reviews rarely delay roads, but it’s a different story when it comes to transit projects or congestion pricing. (Slate)
  • Another article says the infrastructure bill prioritizes highways over transit. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Even rural areas are starting to get serious about road safety. (USA Today)
  • A provision in the infrastructure bill providing funding for low- and no-emissions buses mandates that a quarter of the money be spent on buses that pollute. (Washington Post)
  • Self-driving cars are still nowhere near a reality. (Jalopnik)
  • With its QLine streetcar, Detroit is just the latest city to experiment with fare-free transit in an effort to get more riders onboard. (Quartz)
  • Despite Seattle’s Vision Zero program, cyclists and pedestrians still account for 72 percent of traffic deaths. (Crosscut)
  • The Virginian-Pilot laments the failure of a 2016 referendum to expand Hampton Roads light rail.
  • A Boston survey said more people plan to bike or drive alone to work post-pandemic, while fewer plan to take transit. (WBUR)
  • Miami-Dade transportation planners continue to look into underground tunnels despite the area’s high water table. (Miami Today)
  • Honolulu’s transit agency is floating a tax on hotel rooms to cover a $3.6 billion light rail shortfall. (Civil Beat)
  • Atlanta’s first “transit-oriented” development just lost a restaurant because customers don’t feel safe in its massive parking deck. (11 Alive)
  • Atlanta sidewalks are too busted for delivery droids. (Atlanta Magazine)

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