Friday’s Headlines Won’t Take 15 Minutes to Read

  • The 15-minute city is a laudable goal, but a challenging one to achieve. Will Americans really walk a mile to the bank, install the vast bike infrastructure necessary or pour money into transit? (Governing)
  • Uber and Lyft drivers went on strike Wednesday, demanding better pay and working conditions. (CBS News)
  • City Lab interviews Venezuelan architect Alfredo Brillembourg, whose transformations of urban slums worldwide could hold the key to designing cities of the future.
  • After heavy lobbying by Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Washington, D.C. regional planning board is bringing back $11 billion express lanes along the Beltway. (Washington Post)
  • A newly unveiled plan would connect all of Franklin County, Ohio, using hundreds of miles of trails and waterways. (Columbus Dispatch)
  • The Twin Cities’ Southwest Light Rail project is years behind schedule and hundreds of millions of dollars over budget. (MinnPost)
  • Massachusetts announced $6 million in funding for 18 Complete Streets projects. (Boston Herald)
  • Declining transit ridership between Vancouver, Washington, and Portland led the conservative Washington Policy Center to question whether a new I-5 bridge over the Columbia River needs light rail, or whether bus rapid transit is a better option.
  • East Providence decided to remove a bike lane just one week after it was built because drivers kept going the wrong way. (WJAR)
  • A newly retired Portland transportation employee used scrap materials to make creative sharrows for the city’s bike lanes. (Willamette Week)

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