Tuesday’s Headlines Now that Summer is Really Here

  • The New York Times has an interactive feature on how urban freeways scarred U.S. cities in the mid-20th century. As those freeways reach the end of their lifespans, some cities are considering removing them, including Rochester, New York (City Newspaper). And buried in a massive Colorado transportation bill is $209 million for neighborhoods affected by freeway building (Governing).
  • Senate Republicans’ latest counteroffer to President Biden’s infrastructure plan comes in at $928 billion. (CNBC)
  • Politico brought together 12 leading transportation experts to discuss how transit agencies can recover from the pandemic.
  • A double windfall of a rebound in local tax revenue and federal aid gives cities an opportunity to fix failing infrastructure. City Lab took a road trip to identify pressing projects in 12 cities.
  • Virginia’s transportation secretary wants to put rail on even footing with roads when it comes to funding. (Washington Post)
  • Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan vetoed bills requiring the state to catch up on a backlog of transit maintenance and start marketing the Purple Line. (WTOP)
  • The Los Angeles Metro is launching a fare-free pilot program in August, but school districts that would save on transporting students are reluctant to share the costs. (LAist)
  • Richmond is upgrading its bike-share, and residents of public housing will be able to get free memberships. (Times-Dispatch)
  • Without late-night transit service, Washington, D.C. service industry workers are being hit hard by the recent spike in Uber and Lyft fares. (WJLA)
  • Georgia Sen. Raphael Warnock joined forces with Atlanta transit agency MARTA’s CEO to rally support for transit funding. (Streetsblog)
  • A speeding driver seriously killed a San Francisco resident in May, and days later a speed camera bill stalled in the California legislature. (Examiner)
  • Seattle parking was dirt cheap during the pandemic, but now it’s going back up again. (KIRO)
  • E-scooter ridership is skyrocketing on Hartford’s month-old system. (NBC Connecticut)
  • East Providence is getting its first protected bike lane. (Boston Globe)
  • Sidewalk repairs and new bike lanes are on tap in Grand Rapids. (MLive)
  • A New Hampshire bike group is setting up 11 bike repair stations around Concord. (Monitor)

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