Tuesday’s Headlines Because We’re So Done with Monday

  • Democrat Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, who lost her legs in Iraq, is one of three senators co-sponsoring a $10-billion bill to bring transit stations up to ADA standards. (CBS News, Streetsblog USA)
  • Two U.S. senators want the DOT to study the costs of the damage millions of additional vehicles are doing to highways. (Eno Center for Transportation)
  • A propensity to overbuild and overdesign high speed rail contributes to the high cost in the U.S., which leads to many canceled projects. (Pedestrian Observations)
  • The masculine mindset of American car culture has to change if smaller, more efficient electric vehicles are going to replace ever-bigger and heavier trucks. (Jalopnik)
  • Gas consumption in the U.S. is almost back to pre-pandemic levels. (Reuters)
  • California regulators approved a rule requiring ride-hailing services to transition to EVs by 2030. (Forbes)
  • As residents seek to avoid Miami’s horrible traffic, the city is coalescing into urban neighborhoods or villages where everything is within reach without getting into a car. (Herald)
  • Rebuilding West Virginia’s economy — the worst in the country — starts with infrastructure. (The Hill)
  • San Diego is converting on-street parking downtown into linear parks. (Union-Tribune)
  • The first head of Charlotte’s transit agency says an $8 billion to $12 billion transit plan currently under discussion is too vague and too scattershot. (WFAE)
  • Akron’s new long-range transportation plan includes $2.4 billion for transit and $5.3 billion for roads, but almost all of the road money will go toward maintenance rather than new construction. (Beacon-Journal)
  • Albuquerque mayor Tim Kelly unveiled a Vision Zero plan to eliminate traffic deaths by 2040. (One Albuquerque)
  • The Philly Inquirer called out the SEPTA transit agency for erring on the side of suburban rail. It’s nice to see a hometown paper defend the needs of city residents.
  • Twitter is mad that a new San Jose subway station will be … too far underground? (KPIX)
  • Sweepy McSweepface? Sir Sweeps-a-Lot? OK Broomer? It’s not too late to vote on a name for Seattle’s new street sweeper. (KING)

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