Thursday’s Headlines to Start a New Era

Photo: White House
Photo: White House

Face it, most of the news yesterday was about Amtrak Joe:

  • Bloomberg compared President Joe Biden’s daily train commute from Delaware to Lincoln’s whistle-stop tour.
  • After the inauguration on Wednesday afternoon, the Bidens walked to their new home. (New York Times)
  • Among President Biden’s first actions as president were to sign executive orders rejoining the Paris climate accords and canceling the Keystone XL pipeline. (CNN)
  • Biden’s dreams of passing a huge infrastructure bill will require finding a funding mechanism that’s not politically toxic. (Politico)
  • Incoming Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has an opportunity to make a big impact on transit and climate change. (NRDC)
  • Until Buttigieg is confirmed, Lana Hurdle will run the DOT (White House). Hurdle, a career civil servant, had been the deputy assistant secretary for budget and programs.
  • Philadelphia cyclists and transit riders are big fans of Buttigieg. (WHYY)

In other news:

  • It’s not specific to transportation, but Vice has a guide to finding the right public official to talk to and convincing him or her to do what you want.
  • Proposed high-speed rail between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore could run every eight minutes during peak times and carry 18 million people a year, according to an environmental impact statement. (WaPost)
  • More federal COVID funding announcements: Tampa received $31 million for transit (Governing) and the Twin Cities’ Metro Transit will get $186 million (MSN).
  • Shared moped company Revel’s expansion during the pandemic coincided with a spike in traffic deaths in New York City. (Bloomberg)
  • Italy’s 500-euro subsidy for bikes and e-scooters triggered a massive micromobility boom. (Eltis)
  • A new Chinese maglev train can reach speeds of 385 miles per hour. (CNN)

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Jennifer Granholm, left, and Gina McCarthy, right. Images via Creative Commons.

Unpacking Biden's 'Climate-Change' Cabinet

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Pete Buttigieg drew most of the attention earlier this week, but two other key cabinet appointments this week could signal that electric vehicles remain at the center of the President-elect's climate strategy — despite evidence that transit, walking and biking is far more critical to cutting greenhouse gases.