Tuesday’s Headlines to Keep it Going

  • Will Washington save transit? It depends on whether Joe Biden wins the presidency and Democrats take over the Senate. (CNN)
  • Jaywalking is a made-up concept that encourages aggressive driving, ignores flawed street designs and is often unfairly enforced. (City Lab)
  • 5G wireless internet will allow cyclists to broadcast their location to nearby vehicles and could eventually driver assist systems to automatically brake. (Seattle Times)
  • The Guardian explains California’s Proposition 22, Uber and Lyft’s effort to convince voters to overturn a new labor rights law.
  • Labor unions are working to defeat Prop 22, but they’re outgunned. They’ve spent $12 million to Uber, Lyft and delivery apps’ $185 million. (HuffPost)
  • Portland sued the federal government and removed a concrete wall around the downtown federal courthouse that has been blocking bike lanes since Black Lives Matter protests started in July (Bike Portland). And more big news from Bike Portland: The city has formally withdrawn from the controversial Rose Quarter I-5 widening project.
  • A new D.C. Metro official will be charged with fixing safety and toxic workplace issues in its rail operations control center. (Washington Post)
  • The Minnesota legislature approved $55 million for two Twin Cities bus rapid transit lines. (Patch)
  • Miami-Dade is redesigning its bus system to protect the busiest routes in the event of cuts. (Human Transit)
  • Here’s where road diets and new bike lanes are planned in San Jose. (Mercury News)
  • Detroit bike-share MoGo is offering free one-hour rides to go vote or deliver an absentee ballot (Metro Times). Charleston’s bike-share is also free on Election Day (Post and Courier).
  • As it seeks profitability, Uber is looking to unload its flying taxi division (Axios). Maybe the Jetsons will take it off their hands.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Thursday’s Headlines

|
Can airline-style rewards bring riders back to public transit? Agencies from Portland to Philadelphia think they’ll help attract customers poached by ride-hailing services, but critics say such programs are distractions from real issues like frequency, speed and reliability. (Wired) Since the 1950s, freeways have been shifting people and money from city centers to the suburbs, […]