Tuesday’s Headlines

  • Ten years after Congress passed a law requiring electric and hybrid vehicles to emit a noise when approaching pedestrians, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is giving carmakers another six months to implement it. (Reuters)
  • The federal surface transportation bill expires next month, and it’s a chance to address long-standing issues like reliable funding, climate change and equity. (Next City)
  • President Trump will roll back more environmental regulations if he’s re-elected, says EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. (CNBC)
  • Right-wing counter-protesters continue to use cars as weapons, plowing them through crowds of Black Lives Matter supporters. One group that sped through a protest in New York City even had a police escort. (Slate)
  • The media won’t stop talking about the exodus from cities, despite the fact that it’s not true. (Planetizen)
  • Uber, Lyft and other gig-economy companies have already spend more than $70 million on Prop 22, a ballot initiative seeking to overturn California’s law classifying ride-hailing drivers as employees instead of contractors. (San Francisco Chronicle)
  • Philadelphia’s transit agency, SEPTA, is extending an initiative that sends “social distancing coaches” into transit stations to hand out masks and remind people to stay six feet apart. (Inquirer)
  • Miles driven fell by 17 percent in Colorado during the first six months of 2020, but traffic deaths actually rose from 256 to 259 because too many drivers were careless on the wide-open roads. (Colorado Public Radio)
  • Inspired by Uber, a new Houston Metro app lets people book a ride on its on-demand shuttles for just $1.25. (Houston Chronicle)
  • Metro Atlanta’s new transit agency, the ATL, wants to bond out nine high-priority projects to build them faster. (Saporta Report)
  • Las Vegas bike-share users have doubled during the pandemic. (Sun)
  • Albuquerque’s roads are intimidating for people who aren’t in a car. (Journal)
  • Instead of closing roads to cars, new signage in the London neighborhood of Brixton say roads are open to people on foot, on bikes, on scooters and in wheelchairs. The hope is that the signs will discourage cut-through drivers while allowing residents to access their homes by car. (The Guardian)
  • As schools start up again in Paris, the city is reimbursing riders under age 18 for transit passes — perhaps the first step toward an entirely fare-free system. (Bloomberg)

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