Tuesday’s Headlines So You Know What’s Going On

  • All around the world, the coronavirus pandemic is leading cities to accelerate plans to encourage commuting by bike. (Wall Street Journal)
  • Transportation is a public health issue because people need transportation to access health care, according to a new paper from the Eno Center.
  • The world is watching London’s court battle with Uber over drivers’ rights. (Forbes)
  • The federal Highway Trust Fund is set to run dry next year. (The Hill)
  • Maryland’s congressional delegation wants another $32 billion in coronavirus relief for transit agencies, with a bigger share this time for medium-sized systems. (Baltimore Sun)
  • Dallas Area Rapid Transit was already starved for resources, and thanks to the pandemic now faces a projected $1-billion deficit over the next 20 years. Plans are to cut rail service 10 percent and bus service by 20 percent. (Dallas Observer)
  • New York State submitted a plan to the Federal Highway Administration to remove I-81 through downtown Syracuse. (WSYR)
  • The company that built a pedestrian bridge that collapsed at Florida International University in 2018, killing six people, has been banned from participating in any federal projects for 10 years. (Construction Dive)
  • Milwaukee is using paint and bollards to quickly and cheaply slow down car traffic and create space for bikes. (Urban Milwaukee)
  • A new study says extending the L.A. Metro’s L Line would boost ridership. (Press-Enterprise)
  • A steelworkers’ group accused the D.C. Metro of violating a federal “Buy American” clause as it searches for a company to build $1 billion worth of new rail cars. But Metro says no U.S. company can do the job. (Washington Post)
  • Lyft will roll out 1,500 e-bikes in Portland next month. (Portland Tribune)
  • L.A. Metro e-bikes are just $1 to rent in August.
  • And in more e-bike news, a Gizmodo writer explains how she fell in love with them.

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