Thursday’s Headlines From Around the Nation

  • As France and Japan reopen, no coronavirus clusters have been traced back to transit. It appears that the combination of wearing masks, ventilation and lack of conversation make short bus and train trips relatively safe. (City Lab)
  • If it becomes permanent, working from home will mean fewer people commuting, but it will also encourage sprawl because employees will be free to move out to the suburbs or to cheaper cities. (Forbes)
  • Most automakers are still refusing to sell small cars in the U.S., giving Americans for whom driving is a necessity little choice but to buy deadly, gas-guzzling giant SUVs and pickups. (Jalopnik)
  • A new House bill would provide $250 million in grants for cities to reduce congestion through technology, carpooling or bike/pedestrian projects. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Protected bike lanes reduce collisions between cars and bikes, but painted bike lanes have little effect, and lanes with sharrows actually have more collisions. (Fast Company)
  • If you want to get into cycling — and now is a great time — Slate has a guide to the gear you’ll need.
  • Safe Routes to School’s national organization will no longer call for police to enforce traffic laws because they’re disproportionately enforced against people of color. (Bike Portland)
  • Metro Austin transportation planners are pushing back transit, walking and biking projects to free up $633 million for widening I-35. (Monitor)
  • The Seattle DOT is considering building a tunnel to replace the cracked West Seattle Bridge. (Seattle Times)
  • Atlanta let downtown residents decide how to spend $1 million in transportation funds, and most of the projects they chose were for bikes and pedestrians. (Intown)
  • Washington, D.C.’s street grid is perfect for marches — and that’s intentional. (WAMU)
  • The San Francisco police union told Muni officers won’t enforce fare-dodging on transit anymore since the agency decided to stop diverting buses to take police to demonstrations (Streetsblog SF). Ooh, that’ll teach ’em.

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