Tuesday’s Headlines

  • The U.S. was the only nation out of 140 at a global road safety conference that refused to sign a statement setting a target for reducing traffic deaths. (Forbes, Streetsblog)
  • Traffic deaths in the U.S. were down 2 percent in 2019, to a still unacceptable 38,000, according to the National Safety Council (ABC News). One exception, though, was Oregon, where traffic deaths rose 4 percent (KATU).
  • Why do cities keep letting Uber and Lyft clog up streets, pollute the air and cut into transit ridership? (Los Angeles Times)
  • A planned renovation of Baltimore’s Penn Station will get opportunity zone funding. The $500-million project will include retail and office space, apartments and improved tracks and platforms. (Business Journal)
  • Only 19 percent of Dallas commuters ride transit, and those who do spend 200 more hours a year getting to and from work than drivers. No wonder so few people use it (D Magazine). Meanwhile, transit ridership in Austin is up 8 percent, and that number will grow once a new Metro Rail station opens and double-tracking allows frequency to increase to every 12 to 15 minutes (KXAN). And ridership is up 30 percent in Albuquerque, thanks to bus rapid transit. (KON)
  • The San Antonio News-Express endorsed Mayor Ron Nirenberg’s plan to fund transit by diverting part of a sales tax for aquifer protection.
  • A California lawmaker has introduced a bill to create a bike lane on the Bay Bridge. (San Francisco Examiner)
  • Philadelphia is doubling the size of its e-bike fleet to 250. (KYW)
  • Houston’s B-Cycle bike-share recently opened its 100th station. (Chronicle)
  • A U.K. city is offering residents up to 3,000 pounds to give up their cars. (Forbes)
  • Lyft is putting billboards on top of cars, which means it’s just a yellow paint job away from being a taxi company. (Jalopnik)