Monday’s Headlines

  • Cities can only harness the full benefits of micromobility options like bike-shares and e-scooters if they’re fully integrated into public transit, according to a German study (Traffic Technology Today). But fully integrating micromobility devices and transit requires data, which companies have been reluctant to turn over to cities (Urban Mobility Daily).
  • If Uber and Lyft’s effect on traffic congestion and falling transit ridership, low-paid drivers and record of sexual assaults make you cringe, here’s how to delete the apps and use other options to get around. (The Verge)
  • You can’t pave your way out of congestion, but the Colorado DOT is nonetheless planning to widen I-25 anyway. At least the deal to buy a vacant railyard will benefit light rail, too (Colorado Public Radio). Meanwhile, an Oklahoma City proposal to widen I-35 is meeting backlash (Fox 25).
  • Miami’s new parking-light zoning code shows what can happen when cities get out of developers’ way. (City Journal)
  • Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot is cracking down on drivers who park in bike and bus lanes. (Tribune)
  • Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has ordered 155 electric buses — the largest such order in U.S. history. (KCAL)
  • Milwaukee’s streetcar ridership is exceeding expectations, and it celebrated its millionth rider on Friday. (On Milwaukee)
  • Philadelphia’s new, brighter streetlights could help make streets safer at night. (WHYY)
  • A Kansas City council member has introduced a Complete Streets resolution and wants to rethink how wide, hard-to-cross streets are designed. (KCTV)
  • Nashville needs 1,900 miles of sidewalks, but only four miles a year are being built. (WSMV)
  • Here’s your semi-regular reminder not to trust the Manhattan Institute, which thinks bike lanes are “recreational” and thus not worth government investment.
  • A Spanish company has signed a $6-billion deal to build the first high speed rail line in the U.S., running between Houston and Dallas. But don’t get too excited — it’s not expected to start service until 2042. (RFI)
  • Urbanism isn’t just for cities. Some of the most walkable places on Earth are small, rural villages. (Strong Towns)