Talking Headways Podcast: Designing Ninja-Proof Seats

Talking Headways small

This week, we’re joined by Lily Bernheimer of Space Works Consulting. Bernheimer, a Streetsblog/Open Plans Alum, talks to us about her book “The Shaping of Us: How Every Day Spaces Structure our Lives, Behavior, and Well-Being.” She talks about her research in Environmental Psychology and how human beings have evolved in order to respond to our physical environment. Listen in to learn about ninja-proof seats, mystery-novel models of building, and more on biophilia and human connections to nature.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Talking Headways Podcast: Pro·pin·qui·ty

|
This week's illustrious guests are Robert Cervero, Erick Guerra, and Stefan Al, who tell us all about their new book, Beyond Mobility. We discuss how to recalibrate cities to put people first when we shape transportation and the built environment, silly regulations like requiring parking space per toilet seat, and the best transportation and planning practices the U.S. should borrow from around the world.

Talking Headways Podcast: How Media Has Shaped the City

|
Author Shannon Mattern joins the podcast this week to discuss her new book, Code+Clay, Data+Dirt: 5,000 Years of Urban Media. We talk about why the perfect future interface humans are looking for does not exist, and how digital mapping can overlook important aspects of the urban spatial landscape.

Podcast: The Anatomy of an Urban Cell

|
This week, we're joined by planner Robin Renner, author of "Urban Being: Anatomy and Identity of the City." Robin talks about how living in a number of places around the world got him to think differently about cities — and how urban areas can be improved.

Talking Headways Podcast: Don’t Talk About Professors’ Parking Spaces

|
This week we’re joined by James Corless, CEO of Sacramento's regional planning agency. We chat about the Sacramento area and the connections between its urban and rural economies, his past working on federal transportation advocacy, how mid-sized cities are nationally important for providing jobs and housing, and why it’s kind of ridiculous to do 30-year long range regional transportation plans.