Friday’s Headlines

  • According to the latest Census figures, the number of Americans who bike to work fell by 3 percent from 2016 to 2017. Experts blamed a lack of safe and connected bike infrastructure, although your mileage may vary depending on where you live: Some cities, like Portland, Ore., and Washington, D.C., saw an increase in bike commuting. Others, including Seattle and San Francisco, saw it tumble. (USA Today)
  • Bike-shares are suffering from a persistent perception that they don’t serve low-income neighborhoods. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • New York’s plan to shut down a critical subway line for 15 months starting in April was just jettisoned by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, despite three years of planning for this vital infrastructure fix. (StreetsblogNYC)
  • Phoenix businesses have been whining for some time that light rail expansion will, um, drive away customers, but here’s a reminder that transit equals jobs: A construction contractors’ group has filed a lawsuit seeking to stop rail opponents from putting a repeal of future projects on the ballot. (Arizona Republic)
  • The average Atlanta worker will spend 484 days and $183,000 commuting in a car over his or her career — the most of any American city. (AJC)
  • Uber drivers in Massachusetts have joined their counterparts in California, London and elsewhere in filing a lawsuit alleging the company is skirting federal minimum-wage and overtime rules. (Boston Herald)
  • The supermarket chain Kroger — not Uber, Lyft or Tesla — might be the first company to put autonomous vehicles on the road. (Forbes)
  • Boston’s transit agency is bringing back a popular $10 all-you-can-ride weekend fare. (Globe)
  • Buffalo officials have bowed to backlash (parklash?) over the removal of free parking on nights and weekends. (News)
  • Drivers keep parking in San Diego’s new bike lanes. (KPBS)
  • More cities will go car-free, plus 18 other experts’ predictions for the next 15 years. (Next City)