Wednesday’s Headlines

  • Women spend more money than men on transportation each month, according to a new study, primarily because they don’t feel safe on public transit. (Wired)
  • As the number of women who walk or bike to work declines, according to Census data, Crosscut advocates for a #MeToo-style approach to street safety in Seattle.
  • Houston is having a semantics debate over whether its dangerous streets are a public health threat or a public safety threat. The verdict: Public health is a broader category than many people might think. (Chronicle)
  • Smart Cities Dive has a series on how freight-hauling affects congestion in New York, L.A., Atlanta and Chicago.
  • Estonian ride-hailing company Taxify is worth $1 billion and has 500,000 drivers — and it’s coming for Uber. (CNBC)
  • Uber has a new system for reporting sexual misconduct by drivers, from staring to rape. (ABC News)
  • After fending off a “guerrilla launch,” Arlington, Va. is set to start a pilot program with two e-scooter companies. (WTOP) A pedal-assist bike share is now available in Philadelphia. (Next City)
  • Baltimore will issue refunds to members of the city-run bike-share it ended in August. It’s just not clear when. (Sun)
  • Two Utah residents are biking from Alaska to Argentina. They’ve contended with mountains, headwinds and bears, but asked about the worst part of the journey, one said, “Entering any urban area when you’re on the outskirts and there’s the four-lane with the turn lane with no bike lanes or shoulders.” (Deseret News)
  • Streetsblog International: A driver plowed through a group of cyclists in Trinidad and Tobago, killing two and injuring at least 10 more. (Daily Express) In Bogota, Columbia, streets and highways are closed to cars every Sunday for people on bikes to use. (CGTN)
  • And, finally, if you want to know everything you can about Amazon’s sweetheart deal with New York, our friends at StreetsblogNYC have the ultimate curated list of coverage.