Tuesday’s Headlines

  • As Atlanta finalizes a $2.5-billion transit expansion plan, it’s looking to Minneapolis for inspiration. (AJC)
  • “Cars own the best real estate” in Annapolis, says Mayor Gavin Buckley in defense of the downtown bike lane that’s divided the city. (Capital Gazette)
  • Greater Greater Washington agrees with Streetsblog that e-scooters aren’t necessarily dangerous—but our streets are. Scooter deaths are likely the fault of poor street design that favors cars over other modes of transportation.
  • The Hill has more on the Trump Administration refusing to distribute transit funds. Congress increased funding for transit, and the Federal Transit Administration is thwarting its will.
  • Baton Rouge-area cyclists gathered for a 100-mile ride along a route where a driver killed a city councilman three months ago to promote bike safety. (The Advocate)
  • Milwaukee residents got an up-close look at The Hop, the city’s new streetcar, over the weekend. (CBS 58)
  • Downtown Dayton residents are worried that a major new employer will eat up all the on-street parking in the neighborhood. How about better transit so employees don’t have to drive to work? (Daily News)
  • New details have emerged in the case of a Pinellas County, Fla. shooting over a shopping center parking spot, including the shooter’s alleged use of racial slurs. (Tampa Bay Times)
  • Bike shares open in San Marcos, Tex. (KXAN) and Annapolis (Bay Weekly), expand in Fairfax, Va. (WTOP), eye Tampa (WFTS).
  • Mobility Lab has a roundup of PARK(ing) Day temporary parklets in the D.C. area.
  • Austin Busch

    “CareSource collaborated with the city and will provide parking in the Dayton Transportation Center and the City Hall Parking Garage for staff who work in the new office building, said Dan McCabe, chief administrative officer of CareSource. CareSource expects to offer a shuttle service…”

    It looks like they actually have a bit of a transit plan. I guess the local residents don’t want jobs in Dayton? Seems like a residential problem: “We have more cars in our building than spaces to park,” said Steve Seboldt, who was one of the first residents in the Ice Lofts.”