Who’s to Blame for Drive-to-Urbanism?

New apartments in northwest Atlanta have a walkable footprint but are disconnected from transit. Photo: Darin Givens
New apartments in northwest Atlanta have a walkable footprint but are disconnected from transit. Photo: Darin Givens

When the real estate world tries to deliver walkability, many times the result is better classified as “drive-to-urbanism.”

These developments have the trappings of a walkable place: sidewalks, street trees, compact form with a mix of retail and residential. But it’s still very difficult to get there without a car.

Atlanta is full of these kinds of developments. At Atlanta the City, Darin Givens posted some photos illustrating how a place that should be transit-accessible can still be disconnected unless you drive. This apartment complex in northwest Atlanta looks very walkable, Givens says, but that’s a facade:

The apartments end up only having a sheen of city-ness about them by being up against a nice sidewalk. In reality, I doubt anyone’s walking here, and with the lack of bike lanes, very few are cycling. It may look urban, but mobility behavior is bound to be suburban.

It’s not the developer’s fault. This is the available property that made financial sense to them and they likely followed code with the build out. Blame the city for not having a system for getting new developments aligned with connective pedestrian infrastructure (note that sidewalk maintenance is the responsibility of property owners in Atlanta, while car lanes are publicly funded).

And when we see stats that show a decline in MARTA ridership despite a significant rise in intown population over the last few years, that’s partly the city’s fault as well. We’re not supplying a pedestrian experience — for getting to and from bus stops — that’s able to compete with car ridership. When transit is unable to compete, cars win. No matter how urban the form of an individual structure is, it will struggle to be anything other than a drive-to destination.

Here’s a shot of the closest bus stop:

Photo: Darin Givens
Photo: Darin Givens

Of course, superficial walkability comes in many forms. Outside of urban areas, “lifestyle center” malls built on greenfield sites in distant suburbs are another classic example of drive-to-urbanism. At places like Easton Town Center, outside of Columbus, Ohio, customers can walk from store to store, but the only way to get there is by car.

More recommended reading today: The Transportist proposes a rule of thumb for urban streets — never have more than two lanes carrying general traffic in the same direction. And Reno Rambler considers why small and mid-sized American cities are having a hard time making bike-share systems viable.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Moving Beyond “Drive-to Urbanism”

|
What do you call a place where you can walk once you get there, but most people arrive in a car? Atlanta has plenty of these places, which Darin Givens at ATL Urbanist calls “drive-to urbanism.” Givens interviewed Atlanta planning commissioner Tim Keane on the subject. Here’s what Keane had to say about how Atlanta can get beyond “drive-to urbanism.” […]
The Garnett MARTA station in downtown Atlanta, surrounded by parking

A Fixation on Parking Threatens Transit Progress in Atlanta

|
Darin Givens is frustrated with how Atlanta is planning for the future. “We don’t feel like the city is building transit that fits needs, or places that fit transit,” says the founder of local advocacy site Thread ATL. “You see nodes of density nowhere near transit, located nowhere near a MARTA station or a regular MARTA bus. We’re not matching development and transit.”

The Regions With the Most Potential to Build New Walkable Development

|
To get the economy humming again, America’s metro regions need to build more walkable places, according to a new report from a coalition of real estate developers. The report from LOCUS [PDF], a group of developers and real estate investors who specialize in building walkable projects, examines which regions are seeing the fastest growth in walkable urban […]

Leinberger: Walkable Urbanism Is the Future, and DC Is the Model

|
Chris Leinberger wears too many hats to count – real estate developer, George Washington University professor, Brookings fellow – but he has one message: “Walkable urbanism is the future.” For years now, Leinberger has been preaching the gospel that the postwar era of automobile-oriented “drivable suburbanism” is over – and urbanism is the new wave. […]

Walkable Development Is on the Rise in Michigan

|
As the cradle of the car industry, Michigan built out its cities and suburbs exclusively for the automobile after WWII with a fervor that few other states could match. Today the pendulum of public preference is swinging back toward walkability, but much of Michigan’s housing stock is stuck in the old model. Just 8 percent of homes in […]