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Sorriest Bus Stop in America 2016

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Portland, Oregon vs. Broomfield, Colorado

Streetsblog's quest to highlight the deplorable walking environments and waiting conditions faced by American transit riders continues with the second match of the "Sorriest Bus Stop" tournament. (You can still vote on the first match -- polls are open through the weekend.)

Today pits a bus stop in Portland, Oregon, against one in Broomfield, Colorado.

Portland, Oregon

portland_bridge

This bus stop is on an elevated approach to Portland's Morrison Bridge. Submitter Adam Herstein writes:

Bus stop is on a 1950's-era bridge viaduct that doubles as a highway on/off ramp for Interstate 5. Multnomah County maintains the bridge, and TriMet is responsible for the bus stop. The bus stop can only be accessed by a steep staircase.

Here is the access point for the staircase:

underpass

Agencies in charge: Multnomah County, TriMet.

Pretty terrible. Let's check out the competition.

Broomfield, Colorado

image1 (2)

This entry, located on US-287, comes from Aaron Schultz, who says:

This bus stop serving the city and county Broomfield and RTD (Regional Transportation District, both of whom should be shamed) sits on a highway, and could have taken me to school and to work, but there is no sidewalk to the bus stop, no bench, and the bus stop is on a sign forbidding pedestrians.

Furthermore, the bus stop could get more use, as a new spur is intended to alleviate traffic along the highway, and the bus connects to a regional station. However, the nearest pedestrian crossings are nearly a mile in either direction. This bus stop is the sorriest I've ever seen.

Agencies in charge: Colorado DOT, City and County of Broomfield, Denver Regional Transportation District.

Which is the sorriest? Vote away:

Here's the map of the competitors so far, with today's pair in green. We'll be adding to it as the tournament progresses.

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