Skip to Content
Streetsblog USA home
Streetsblog USA home
Log In
Congestion

Stuck With Bad Transit Options? There’s an App for That.

The next time your subway car is overcrowded, or your train is delayed, or your bus is bogged down in traffic, you can access a direct line to your members of Congress and let them know you’re not gonna take it anymore.

When tell your members of Congress you're stuck, be specific about how they can unstick you. Image courtesy of BAF.

Building America’s Future, a lobbying group for more federal infrastructure spending, just released their new app, “I’m Stuck,” designed to help constituents sound off to their representatives about their frustration with the state of U.S. infrastructure.

New York City bicycle advocate Joanna Oltman Smith joked on Twitter that the "'I'm Stuck' gripe app should auto-disable for drivers 'stuck' where transit options exist." BAF's call for more infrastructure spending is devoid of that kind of nuance. More roads, more transit, more repair funds, more broadband -- they want it all. The app sends a broad message to Congress that Americans want more spending without being very specific about how or where or for what.

Luckily, the app does provide space for users to supply those details in an "Add Description" field.

That's key, since you can’t trust Congress to take the right action, even if they do take action. So, enlightened drivers can write in, “I’m stuck in traffic and I wish I had better transportation options so I could get out of my car and take the train instead! Increase transit funding!”

Marcia Hale, president of BAF, says they hope users will push for more transit if they don't think building lots of highways is the answer to the traffic jam they're stuck in.

Without a note specifying otherwise, lawmakers could easily take commuters’ frustration to mean that they want roads expanded -- and that’s not a real solution to traffic congestion.

The app isn't just for drivers, however. Transit riders can signal their frustration with creaky rail systems or unreliable buses. And though there isn't an explicit option for bicycle and pedestrian frustrations, that's what the "other" category is for, if you ask me. If you just got sideswiped and you're angry about poor safety and the lack of dedicated bicycle facilities in your town, tell your congressperson! No sidewalks? Register your complaint! They're not your city council members -- they're not going to address the particular problem on your particular street. But they should know that their constituents want federal funding for all modes of transportation, not just driving.

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, co-chair of Building America’s Future, told reporters this morning that he hopes the app will be "a permission slip from the American people" giving lawmakers political cover for spending more money on infrastructure. Let's hope that permission slip comes with an asterisk, indicating that the American people want that money spent wisely, on infrastructure that will make us and our communities safer and healthier.

You only have to enter your personal information once and the app will figure out who your representatives are in Congress. Marcia Hale, president of BAF, emphasizes that they don’t intend for people to use the app while they’re driving -- a message pops up when you open the app warning you not to.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog USA

Wednesday’s Headlines Are Running on Empty

Fewer commutes to downtown offices means less money to fund transit services, even as money for autocentric infrastructure keeps right on flowing.

April 17, 2024

What to Say When Someone Claims ‘No One Bikes or Walks in Bad Weather’

Yes, sustainable modes are more vulnerable to bad weather. But that's why we should invest more in them — not less.

April 17, 2024

Chicago Announces $2M Federal Grant to Address Harms Caused By I-290

The Mayor's Office says the money will fund "improvements for people walking and bicycling on existing streets and paths surrounding and crossing the corridor."

April 16, 2024

Car Crashes by City Workers Cost NYC Taxpayers $180M in Payouts Last Year: Report

A record number of victims of crashes involving city employees in city-owned cars filed claims in fiscal year 2023 — and settlements with victims have jumped 23 percent, a new report shows.

April 16, 2024

Tuesday’s Headlines Are Driving Inflation

Driving — specifically, the cost of car ownership — is one of the main factors behind inflation, according to the Eno Center for Transportation.

April 16, 2024
See all posts