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USA Today: Homebuilders Pass On Garages, Build Front Porches

USA Today reported today that more and more homes are being built without garages or carports. That stands to reason, as developers are (belatedly) building what the market wants: denser housing in walkable urban centers near transit. Copious parking and driveway curb cuts simply don't mesh with that model.

My front porch. Photo: Tanya Snyder

At the peak of the housing boom in 2004 -- when the exurbs were still thriving -- 92 percent of new homes had a car shelter. By 2010 it was down to 87 percent, and held steady in 2011. National Association of Home Builders' Stephen Melman told USA Today it was a positive sign "about public transportation if new construction is starting to be built closer to employment centers or transit."

Almost as exciting: Front porches are making a comeback. "Two-thirds of new homes built in 2011 had a porch," write USA Today's Haya El Nasser and Paul Overberg, "a trend that has been on a steady rise for almost 10 years, according to a Census survey of construction."

Impressively, they don't take this trend at face value, assuming it's nothing more than a housing fad. They dig deeper into emerging consumer preferences for how we want to live and what kind of society we want -- one with "smaller houses and dense neighborhoods that promote walking and social interaction."

Bingo! Using real estate prices as a guide, developer and walkability guru Chris Leinberger shows that walkable urban places, which he calls WalkUPs, have tremendous and growing appeal. Dr. Green admitted he was surprised by how high the premiums are for walkable neighborhoods. Office space in WalkUPs can (and does) command a 75 percent premium over the drivable suburbs. And residential rents are 71 percent higher in walkable, transit-oriented neighborhoods.

The increased sociability of those sought-after neighborhoods may have something to do with the fact that porches are displacing back decks as the outdoor hangout of choice. Despite overwhelming evidence that what Americans want most is privacy, more and more people are opting to face the street and see their neighbors, rather than hide behind hedgerows.

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