Streetfilms: Bill Lind, a Conservative Voice for Transit

At last month’s Rail-Volution conference in Boston, Streetfilms was able to grab a few moments with William Lind, a politically conservative transit advocate. Lind aims to provide "liberal transit advocates" the language to build support for public transportation (okay, just rail) in terms that conservatives can relate to. Some of Lind’s arguments don’t reflect our views here at Streetfilms, especially his disdain for buses (which we don’t cover in this video), but he makes a thought-provoking case for transit investment. Streetsblog readers won’t want to miss his critique of highway spending as a massive government intervention.

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