Adding More Transportation to the Climate Change Mix

v0001261.jpg…How about this one? (Photo: Wellsy’s World)
R000361.jpgIs this senator gettable for the climate bill? (Photo: Washington Post)

Nate Silver’s new analysis of the state of play on climate change in the Senate makes a convincing argument that a carbon cap-and-trade system can become law this year.

In fact, it raises the question of whether two senators ranked as unlikely yes votes can be won over by beefing up the climate bill’s treatment of transportation emissions beyond what was passed in the House.

Silver’s analysis gives Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) a 17 percent chance of voting for climate legislation, thanks to his state’s red-tinged voting pattern and reliance on the coal industry. But it’s hard to see Rockefeller opposing a climate bill that includes his proposal to reduce national  transportation-based emissions by 40 percent by 2030 — which would go a long way towards meeting overall targets for greenhouse gas reduction.

And what about Sen. George Voinovich (R-OH), who reminded fellow members of the Environment and Public Works Committee last month that a new transportation bill would go a long way towards reducing emissions?

Voinovich hails from an industrial state, and he supported a filibuster of last year’s Senate climate bill. Still, he sounds susceptible to an argument from Democratic leaders that in the absence of a broad federal transportation bill this year, it’s important to tackle the issue during the climate change debate.

(ed. note. A typo in an earlier version of this post mis-labeled Voinovich’s party. Thanks to the commenter in question.)

  • Jon

    Actually, Sen. Voinovich is a Republican Senator from Ohio. Although I can understand your confusion, it’s hard to tell sometimes.

  • Are electric autos thought to reduce emissions? Is the coal they consume counted against this reduction?
    Are hybrid autos thought to reduce emissions? They promote the continued growth of the failed, wasteful system of sprawl. All energy saved by them is quickly consumed by this system.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

The Senate Climate Bill Reaches a First Milestone Today — Maybe

|
The Senate environment committee is slated to begin formally voting on its climate change bill today in an atmosphere of high drama, thanks to Republican members who have vowed to boycott the proceedings in a bid to delay the legislative process. Senate environment chairman Barbara Boxer (D-CA), at right, with the panel’s top Republican, Jim […]

At Senate Climate Hearings, Lots of Transport Talk and All Eyes on Baucus

|
The Senate environment committee today held the first in a three-part marathon of hearings on its climate change legislation, with supporters singling out the bill’s investments in clean transportation even as one senior Democrat notably withheld his support from the measure. Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) (Photo: Baucus 08) The Senate climate bill calls […]

White House Staying Quiet For Now on Transit’s Role in Climate Bill

|
Delivering his climate-change message to Congress yesterday, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood warned that fuel-efficiency advances secured by the Obama administration would not be enough to reduce emissions from transportation — not without encouraging Americans to drive less. Transportation Secretary LaHood said today he’ll weigh in later on climate-change money for transit. (Photo: HillBuzz) But when […]