All Aboard Monday’s Headlines

Image: Rennett Stowe, CC
Image: Rennett Stowe, CC
  • Amtrak is using federal infrastructure funds to replace 40-year-old rail cars on 14 long-distance routes. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Despite raking in $200 billion in profits last year, oil companies are fighting proposed windfall taxes in California and Europe. (EWG)
  • Uber’s lobbying activities in France are under investigation. (The Guardian)
  • Maryland’s Purple Line is now five years behind schedule after another delay pushed the opening to mid-2027. (Washington Post)
  • Honolulu’s long-delayed light rail line may finally open this spring. (Trains)
  • Omaha is still moving forward with a downtown streetcar despite billionaire investor and Omaha native Warren Buffett’s opposition. (New York Times)
  • Bigger vehicles, more distractions and roads designed for speed contributed to Los Angeles’ 300-plus traffic deaths last year. (L.A. Times)
  • When Lime removed shared Blue Bikes from New Orleans in 2021, activists reimagined it as a community-owned program. (Grist)
  • Transit agencies in Chicago and Philadelphia have committed to hiring more minority-owned contractors. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser says federal employees working remotely are killing the city’s economy. (Politico)
  • A developer is planning a walkable neighborhood in Houston’s East End. (Houston Public Media)
  • A new Vision Zero report reveals Nashville’s most dangerous streets. (WSMV)
  • Milwaukee joined the National Association of City Transportation Officials, the more safety-focused of two major professional transportation groups. (Urban Milwaukee)
  • When Starbucks customers repeatedly blocked an Arlington, Virginia, bike lane, the city took action. (ARLnow)
  • Denver’s “snow angels” help people clear snow off their sidewalks who can’t do it themselves (CBS News). Maybe they can take care of the bike lanes, too? (9 News)

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Amtrak to Begin Welcoming Bikes on Long-Distance Routes

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The nation’s intercity passenger rail service just got a lot bike-friendlier. Amtrak announced last week that it is installing new baggage cars — equipped for bike storage — in all trains on its long-distance routes by year’s end. The change will allow Amtrak riders to “roll on” their bikes, rather than disassembling them and transporting them […]

Political Piñata Amtrak Is the Fastest Growing Transportation Mode

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Let it be known: Amtrak is the fastest! Fastest-growing, that is. Since 1997, Amtrak ridership has grown 55 percent — faster than the general population, faster then GDP, faster than air travel, faster than driving, faster than any other mode of transportation. Even in a difficult political environment, more people are choosing Amtrak, according to […]

UPDATE: Reminder: Amtrak Subsidies Pale in Comparison to Highway Subsidies

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UPDATED 9/24 with chart. House Transportation Committee Chair John Mica continued his “holy jihad” against Amtrak yesterday, holding the third full-committee hearing in a series on “Reviewing Amtrak’s Operations.” He’s planning at least three more hearings during the lame duck session after the election. Mica went after subsidies in this one, and he clearly thinks […]

What’s New in the House Amtrak Bill?

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In what’s being called a “rare burst of bipartisanship,” the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a bill yesterday reauthorizing Amtrak funding for four years at its current levels. Despite a last-minute, Koch brothers-backed push to eliminate funding for the railroad completely, the House advanced its bill to provide Amtrak with $1.7 billion annually for four years. It’s […]

Don’t Look Now, But the House Amtrak Bill Actually Has Some Good Ideas

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Tomorrow, the House Transportation Committee will consider a bill that changes the nation’s policies on passenger rail. The proposal, while it includes some cuts, is a departure from the senseless vendetta many House Republicans have waged against Amtrak in the past. The National Association of Railroad Passengers, NARP, says the plan contains “commonsense regulatory and […]