Wednesday’s Headlines Are Climbing Uphill

  • There will be plenty of horse-race coverage on infrastructure this week (Politico), but if you’re looking for substance, Yonah Freemark posted a handy chart on Twitter showing what’s in the bipartisan and reconciliation bills.
  • Certain design features can help convince suburbanites to accept higher-density buildings. (Sidewalk Talk)
  • A UK study predicts a pretty frightening future where autonomous vehicles choke the roads and air taxes usurp buses. (Forbes)
  • The Labour Party is warning against squandering the cycling gains made during the pandemic. (The Guardian)
  • Amazon is creating hundreds of small delivery companies as a way to dodge legal liability and pay lower wages. (American Prospect)
  • The “safety score” system Tesla uses to decide who gets access to “full self-driving” is a joke. (Vice)
  • Something is wrong when a 12-lane highway in Utah can win a “quality of life” award. (Washington Post)
  • Unless the D.C. region does more to discourage driving, an unrealistic number of drivers would have to switch to electric vehicles to meet climate-change goals. (Greater Greater Washington)
  • A new Texas law will actually punish drivers who injure pedestrians. (News Channel 6)
  • The Providence Bicycle Collective is addressing social injustice by helping people repair their bikes and lobby for better infrastructure. (ecoRI)
  • Windsor, Canada, is pitching a new riverfront route for its 103-year-old restored streetcar. (Star)
  • Florence, Italy, is adding two new lines to its “bike subway,” which may or may not be underground, but is organized like a subway, with color-coded routes. (The Mayor)
  • This is the last thing you’ll see before a Toyota Tundra’s giant grill pancakes you. (Jalopnik)

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