Friday’s Headlines Are a Home Run

  • Cities shouldn’t just tear down freeways, they should be focused on replacing pavement in general, which covers 30 percent of urban land area. (Next City)
  • In its biggest investment in 50 years, Amtrak is spending $7 billion to upgrade its rolling stock by replacing 40 percent of its trains over the next decade. (Washington Post)
  • President Biden is on the defensive about rising gas prices, with Press Secretary Jen Psaki saying that’s one reason he opposed a gas or vehicle-miles tax to fund infrastructure  — even though higher gas prices discourage people from driving. (The Hill)
  • Folks in St. Paul had a big legislative win for their Rondo land bridge project, and they’ve privately credited Streetsblog’s coverage with helping them gain the momentum they need to make this happen. (Pioneer-Press)
  • Orange County, California, fought transit for decades, but now it’s building a streetcar. (Los Angeles Times)
  • Madison, Wisconsin’s mayor hopes Gov. Tony Evers has a plan to replace the transit funding the state legislature cut from its budget. (WKOW)
  • A Philadelphia e-scooter startup is looking to break into the bike-share business. (WHYY)
  • London is planning on reducing speed limits to 20 miles per hour, which should make streets safer and encourage people to ride bikes. (Traffic Technology Today)
  • A Toronto web exhibit documents how mass transit in the city has changed over the past 170 years. (Daily Hive)
  • A hero cyclist in Mexico saw a car blocking the bike lane and just … walked right over it. (Mexico News Daily)
  • At the All-Star Game in Denver? Here’s how to skip the rental car and get around on transit. (The Know)
  • This is what happens when drivers speed on wet roads. (Twitter)

 

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