Monday’s Headlines

  • Startups are abandoning suburban office parks in favor of urban areas with good transit. (City Lab)
  • Vice gets to the heart of Uber and Lyft’s desperate battle against a California bill reclassifying drivers as employees rather than contractors: It could destroy their unsustainable business model by increasing the already unprofitable companies’ labor costs.
  • Likewise, a University of Colorado professor writing in the L.A. Times recognizes how e-scooters and other tech companies are disrupting cities’ ecosystems — and not in a good way.
  • An Uber glitch last week charged customers 100 times their actual fares. (CBS News)
  • New Jersey transit stranded 12,000 wrestling fans for hours after a WWE event on Friday. (Deadspin)
  • Houston could add park-and-ride lots or other projects back into November’s $3.5-billion transit referendum, thanks to $400 million in cost savings. (Chronicle)
  • Not only is Philadelphia’s Spring Garden Street in need of bike lanes in its own right, they would complete the city’s portion of a 3,000-mile bike trail connecting South Florida and Maine. (PlanPhilly)
  • Cars are the lowest priority for Midtown Atlanta residents, a transportation survey found, ranking even behind controversial e-scooters. And almost everyone in the neighborhood wants better walking and biking infrastructure. (Curbed)
  • Maryland is in trouble with a $2-billion shortfall in transit funding. (WTOP)
  • Early voting on the future of light rail in Phoenix starts in two weeks. (CBS 5)
  • Seattle’s Link light rail has seen 134 million boardings since it started running 10 years ago, and it’s still growing. (Kent Recorder)
  • Hey, Triad City Beat: Reverse parking isn’t un-American — it’s un-dangerous (or at least less dangerous than backing out).
  • And, finally, everyone is talking about the 50th anniversary of the first manned mission to the moon, but Wired asked, “How long would it take to bike to the moon?” Now that’s a mission not even JFK had the guts to order up.