Detroit to Add 50 Miles of Bike Lanes This Year

Detroit’s streets are changing, and it’s a beautiful thing to witness. Despite its recent bankruptcy, thanks to the help of philanthropic institutions in the area, the Motor City is moving to repair some of the damage that’s been done by decades of promoting the speed of cars over the health of neighborhoods.

New bike lanes are hitting the streets in Detroit. Image: ##http://wearemodeshift.org/detroits-east-side-gets-new-bike-lanes##We Are Mode Shift##

That includes new investments in transit projects: M1 rail plans for Woodward Avenue, as well as bus rapid transit connecting to the suburbs. And it includes bikes as well. David Sands at We Are Mode Shift reports that the city is putting down a lot of stripes this year:

Cyclists on Detroit’s East Side have a reason to celebrate this month. Right now, the city’s Department of Public Works is in the process of laying down bike lanes on Kercheval that will ultimately stretch from Grand Boulevard to St. Jean.

Part of the route has already been set down and the rest is expected to be completed by the end of construction season. The Kercheval bike lanes are pretty basic, consisting of pavement markings and associated signage. When completed, they’ll cover about four miles total, two on each side of the road.

Prasad Nannapaneni, a traffic engineer with the City of Detroit, says the new Kercheval bicycle route is intended for both transportation and recreation, adding that it’s a segment of a larger undertaking.

“These new bike lanes will provide connection between Belle Isle and 8 Mile road (part of [the] Governor’s showcase trail from Belle Isle to Wisconsin),” he told Mode Shift in an email.

Currently Detroit has 68 miles of bike projects. This includes 38 miles of bike lanes on city streets and five miles of bike lanes on MDOT streets, 10 miles of signed routes, and 15 miles of off road paths, according to Nannapaneni.

Altogether his department is planning to add about 50 new miles of bike lanes this year. In addition to the Kercheval lanes, the city is putting down 19.5 miles on Grand Boulevard from River Park to Belle Isle, 10.5 miles on Oakman Boulevard from Tireman to Highland Park’s city limits, 4 miles on on Lafayette between I-375 and Grand Blvd, 2.8 miles on Forest between Dequindre and Cadillac, 3.7 miles on State Fair between Woodward to Dequindre and 3 miles on St. Jean/ Shoemaker/Conner between Mack and Harper.

Elsewhere on the Network today: Encouraging news from Beantown, as Boston Streets reports that eight mayoral candidates turned out to a recent campaign forum hosted by advocates for sustainable transportation, i.e. “the bike lobby.” Meanwhile, Rebuilding Place in the Urban Space remarks on the tension between city dwellers’ desire for more commercial amenities and their reluctance to welcome new people into their neighborhood to support those businesses.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

NYC Gets Its First-Ever Physically-Separated Bike Path

|
The Department of Transportation revealed plans for New York City’s first-ever physically-separated bike lane, or "cycle track," at a Manhattan Community Board 4 meeting last night. The new bike path will run southbound on Ninth Avenue from W. 23rd to W. 16th Street in Manhattan. Unlike the typical Class II on-street bike lane in which […]

Portland Tries Out "Advisory Bike Lanes"

|
Portland is importing a new kind of bike lane design from the Netherlands. “Advisory bike lanes” allow drivers to use the bike lane space if they have to — and if it’s safe. Jonathan Maus at Bike Portland reports that advisory bike lanes are intended for streets with high bike traffic but not a high volume of […]

Protected Bike Lanes Attract Riders Wherever They Appear

|
Michael Andersen blogs for The Green Lane Project, a PeopleForBikes program that helps U.S. cities build better bike lanes to create low-stress streets. Second in a series. The data has been trickling in for years in Powerpoint slides and stray tweets: On one street after another, even in the bike-skeptical United States, adding a physical […]

Vote to Decide the Best Urban Street Transformation of 2014

|
If you’re searching for reasons to feel positive about the future, the street transformations pictured below are a good start. Earlier this month we asked readers to send in their nominations for the best American street redesigns of 2014. These five are the finalists selected by Streetsblog staff. They include new car-free zones, substantial sidewalk […]