Recent Streetsblog USA posts about Podcast

Talking Headways Podcast: The Uber Effect

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This week we're joined by Andrew Salzberg, head of transportation policy and research at Uber. Andrew talks about growing up in Montreal and his previous transportation work at the World Bank. We also chat about the importance of transportation policy at the city level and Uber's support for congestion pricing.

Talking Headways Podcast: Infill Is Brain Damage

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This week I chat with Susan Henderson of PlaceMakers about the use and benefits of form-based codes. A form-based approach to development codes can support transit and affect the feel and function of streets. Susan tells us why people might push back against form-based codes and how to frame conversations about their benefits.

Talking Headways Podcast: When Is My City Going to Fit?

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This week, Mikael Colville-Andersen joins the podcast to talk about his book, Copenhagenize. Mikael tells us how his children influence his work and his feelings about bike culture. He also shares which innovations he believes help move bikes as transportation forward, and elaborates on his disdain for e-bikes and scooters -- which recently received a lot of pushback on social media.

Talking Headways Podcast: The Eternal Rush Hour

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This week Talking Headways returns to the Michelin Movin On conference in Montreal with guest Greg Rogers, director of government affairs and mobility innovation at Securing America's Future Energy, which promotes reduced oil dependence. Greg discusses autonomous vehicle regulation around the country and the limits of techno-optimism. We also review what worked and what bombed at the Movin On conference.

Talking Headways Podcast: Highways and Partisanship

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This week we're joined by Clayton Nall, a professor of political science at Stanford University, to discuss his new book about the interstate highway system and political partisanship -- The Road to Inequality: How the Federal Highway Program Polarized America and Undermined Cities. Professor Nall discusses how partisanship affects the way people think about transportation projects, and historical shifts in the politics of transportation policy.