Talking Headways Podcast: You Can’t Surf After the Storm

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This week we’re talking about water in cities. It’s a topic that doesn’t get much attention because the infrastructure is mostly underground, but after putting this together I believe thinking about water infrastructure and climate change is more important than ever.

Wastewater and storm water treatment is far behind where it should be in many American cities. In this episode I chat with NRDC water experts Alisa Valderrama and Rob Moore about the dangers of storm water runoff on streets and in flood-prone watersheds. Rob discusses flood data, the national flood insurance program’s propensity for allowing rebuilding in flood-prone areas, and what climate data actually tells us. Alisa talks about the different types of storm water systems in U.S. cities, the desire of economic development directors to make cities proud of their waterways, and green solutions that will save money while also cleaning polluted waterways.

So check it out, and until we get better about greening our water systems make sure you don’t go surfing in San Diego after a storm.

  • Ely

    Good podcast! I wonder if one thing was missed. Various voices in Urbanism have raised the alarm over on-site water infiltration requirements as a smokescreen for sprawl development. They single out Landscape Urbanists particularly for criticism. Basically, the argument is that environmentalism is being co-oped here to diminish the density of urban places, and that this is bad because attractive density has the best chance of stopping sprawl.

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