America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: San Francisco vs. Hillsboro, Oregon

Oh, the terrible places you’ll go to catch a bus. So far this week in our hunt for the Sorriest Bus Stop in America, a bus stop in Boston knocked off a real catastrophe in Nassau County to advance to the second round. Meanwhile, voting remains open until midnight in a tight contest between Maryland and Delaware.

Help narrow the field of 16 dangerous, uncomfortable bus stops down to eight by voting on these two West Coast competitors.

Hillsboro, Oregon

Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 1.46.46 PM

This sad space comes to us from Sameer Moudgil. People really do wait for the bus here — notice the human being on the left side of the Google Street View. Moudgil writes:

It has no bench, no shelter, no sidewalk and no crosswalk access within 0.3 miles. It sits sandwiched between the edge of a 50mph 7-lane stroad (including 2 bike lanes) and a heavy railroad track. The cherry on the cake is the Ford car/truck dealership on the other side of the stroad. I wanted to get a better angle from near the bus-stop but I couldn’t muster up the courage to cross this freeway-like behemoth. I wonder how the lady in the Google street view image managed to do it.

Here’s an alternate view that better captures the atmosphere:

Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 1.40.49 PM

Agencies in charge: Oregon DOT, Tri-Met.

San Francisco 

unnamed

This stop on Lincoln Way, outside Golden Gate Park, comes to us from Janice Li, who writes:

I know this is probably not the nation’s most compelling example because of San Francisco’s dense urban landscape (“how bad can it be?”, I imagine people would say) but there were 3 pedestrian deaths on this corridor in five years. This location remains on San Francisco’s high-injury network, as designated by the city’s Department of Public Health.

Lincoln Way forms the southern border of SF’s premiere park, Golden Gate Park. It has a 35 mph speed limit but is a known speed corridor.

The 29-Sunset outbound drops you off on a patch of sidewalk. You notice that there is actually no sidewalk on that side of the street, despite that being the edge of the park. So, for example, if you want to take the bus to go the park, you have to cross the street, walk a block or two to wherever the next park entrance is, then cross again.

There are zero traffic controls at nearly every crossing along Lincoln Way (no stop signs, traffic signals, etc.). You hope for the goodness of people, who are driving 40-45 mph, to see you in time and stop.

Agency in charge: SFMTA.

An interesting choice today — the suburban stroad bus stop without much besides a stick in the ground vs. the urban bus stop with minimal pedestrian infrastructure that exposes more people to dangerous conditions.

Which bus stop is the sorriest?

  • Hillsboro (70%, 325 Votes)
  • San Francisco (30%, 137 Votes)

Total Voters: 462

Here’s the map of all the contestants so far, with today’s matchup in green.

  • Jason

    I’m voting San Francisco just because I feel like SF should know better.

  • Alex Brideau III

    I can’t even see a “fail trail” heading to/from the Hillsboro stop. I wonder what the logic was for having a stop here.

  • calwatch

    Down the street is Permapost Products, which appears to be a lumber factory, and it serves a cemetery and a small subdivision. It’s a thousand feet away from a much better stop: https://www.google.com/maps/@45.5012174,-122.9383769,3a,75y,125.76h,73.82t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sY7XXiICjMZy2omKSbfhz5w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en-US

    Going in the westbound direction, the gap is about 2800 feet, so without this stop, the spacing is around 3/4 a mile, which is pretty high. TV Highway is on the Trimet frequent bus network so a lot of riders pass by it. One concern if you eliminate the stop is that cemetery visitors, many of whom are elderly and probably carless, are now walking an extra quarter mile to and from seeing their departed loved ones.

  • laldm109

    Voting for SF because the only way to get there is a crosswalk with no traffic controls. That’s almost worse than not having a crosswalk at all because it gives you a false sense of security and someone not paying attention might assume that the intersection has a stop sign or something that will keep them from getting hit if they cross. Plus, SF should know better, since tons of people use transit there.

  • david vartanoff

    I would substitute this NB stop on Bayshore in SF
    https://www.google.com/maps/@37.745755,-122.4039016,3a,75y,78.4t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sP-9xdF8fD1-4xqkmv9yAKg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
    the yellow band on a light pole is the clue to the stop. Sad to say that a “transit first” city has several similarly forlorn stops.

  • david vartanoff
  • Ted King

    David V.’s stop is a gap filler in an industrial sector just south of a freeway ramp knot. SFMuni has a four level hierarchy of stop markings and this is a level 3. There’s a level 1 a couple of blocks to the south at Oakdale with a shelter, NextMuni box, and a pedestrian bridge across US-101.

    I agree that it is a poor grade of markings in a supposedly “Transit First” city but the boardings are probably very few at that location. The post’s choice is in a residential neighborhood with non-feasance on the part of Park+Rec as well as DPW. Coupled with an ugly stroad and you’ve got a nasty mess.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Broomfield vs. Kansas City

|
It’s Final Four time in Streetsblog’s Sorriest Bus Stop tournament. After two rounds, only the least appealing, most dehumanizing bus stops are still standing. In addition to today’s contestants, a bus stop in Boston has advanced to the semi-finals. Voting remains open until midnight to determine the last slot in the Final Four — Silver Spring or Asheville. On to today’s match… […]

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Atlanta vs. Asheville

|
What makes a terrible bus stop? The absence of sidewalks, a place to sit, and shelter — that’s all part of the recipe. What else can DOTs and transit agencies throw into the mix? We’ve seen a few varieties of awfulness in this year’s “Sorriest Bus Stop in America” competition. Earlier this week, a bus stop in Hillsboro, […]

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Boston vs. Nassau County, NY

|
Our search for the sorriest bus stop in America — a virtual tour of the deplorable waiting conditions transit riders have to put up with — continues today with the third match in the round of 16. Last week, bus stops in Broomfield, Colorado, and St. Louis County beat out the competition from Portland, Oregon, and Kingsport, Tennessee. There are still […]

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Kansas City vs. St. Louis County

|
The second round of competition in the search for the Sorriest Bus Stop in America gets underway today. (The poll is still open until midnight in the Buffalo vs. Rochester match if you haven’t voted yet.) Two bus stops in Missouri go toe-to-toe today. Kansas City’s entry overcame some tough competition from D.C. in the first round. Meanwhile, St. Louis County — also […]

America’s Sorriest Bus Stop: Portland, Oregon vs. Broomfield, Colorado

|
Streetsblog’s quest to highlight the deplorable walking environments and waiting conditions faced by American transit riders continues with the second match of the “Sorriest Bus Stop” tournament. (You can still vote on the first match — polls are open through the weekend.) Today pits a bus stop in Portland, Oregon, against one in Broomfield, Colorado. Portland, Oregon […]