Talking Headways Podcast: Biking and Walking Trends, Benchmarked

Christy Kwan, interim director of the Alliance for Biking and Walking, joins us this week to talk about the alliance’s bi-annual national Benchmarking Report. It’s full of great information and Christy shares how local activists might put it to good use in their communities (and why they might not want their cities to score too well in the rankings).

Among the trends we discuss: the decline in public health according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control, and rising cycling fatalities among senior citizens. We also get into the data collection methods available now and in the future to measure walking and biking.

Christy wraps up with a look at the prospects for walking and biking in some cities, like Atlanta, that might surprise you with their awesome programs. So download the report and see where your city ranks as you listen along.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Report: More Kids Are Walking to School

|
The long–term decline of walking and biking to school has been linked to the childhood obesity epidemic, a big share of morning rush hour traffic, and even kids’ lack of attention in class. In 1969, 41 percent of children in grades K–8 lived within one mile of school, and of those kids, 89 percent usually walked or biked. By 2009, […]

Targeted Spending Helps Boost Kansas City’s Walkability

|
The Alliance for Biking and Walking released a big new report yesterday that measures the nation’s progress on active transportation. There’s a ton of data to nerd out on, but one thing that might be particularly interesting to local advocates is that the report shows biking and walking statistics for individual cities. It has details […]

Less Affluent Americans More Likely to Bike for Transportation

|
Who are bike improvements for? That can be a contentious question in cities where the implementation of bike infrastructure is associated with affluent white people. But as the above chart from Michael Andersen at People for Bikes shows, lower-income Americans are actually more likely than wealthy people to use a bike to get to work: […]