Bike Infrastructure Where You Live

2431267368_4bf6ca67f3.jpgThis path on New York’s Randall’s Island gives cyclists plenty of space. (Photo: Bicycles Only)

Get ready for another Streetsblog Network slide show.

This time, in honor of National Bike Month, we’re looking for pictures of bicycle infrastructure that you love. Lanes, trails, paths, signs, signals, parking, you name it — we want to see the best examples from all over the country.

We know there’s a lot of innovative stuff being built out there, and we’re counting on you to show us something we haven’t seen before, or just something that you’re particularly fond of.

You can send me JPEGs at sarah [at] streetsblog [dot] org, or tag your photos "streetsblog infrastructure" in Flickr. Please include caption information and let us know how you’d like to be credited. Get your photos to us by the afternoon of Friday, May 21.

To see a couple of examples of past user-generated slide shows, check out this one of work bikes, or this one of space hogs (those would be cars).

  • As a pedestrian, I can view the illustration only with puzzlement and alarm. I’m not sure if it would be physically possible for me to stay within the borders of the “ped only” zone even if I folded my arms and took baby steps.

  • Looks to be about a yard wide. I suggest you get your balance checked if you think that is un-navigable. But if you are a yard wide perhaps you have a serious problem of another kind. Personally I could sprint down that PED ONLY area and never touch the line.

  • Pedestrians can only walk in one direction?

  • Runjikol, the width of the path appears to be almost identical to the width of the bike wheel. That’s nowhere near three feet. Thanks for the gratuitous insult.

  • calm down folks, that small area appears to be for slow moving pedestrians, eg old folks :p and I am pretty sure its designed to keep slower moving folks to the right, not that you will be ticketed if you step outside πŸ˜‰
    This is where they should be be in the scheme of active transportation networks based on speed of the user πŸ™‚

    note that the markings where the cyclist are also including a running man, for pedestrians moving faster than a turtle πŸ™‚

    True they could have widened it a bit, but its not like a road where not staying in your “lane” is the end of the world πŸ˜‰

    lets stop insulting(or intimating at) the pedestrians who comment, thanks πŸ™‚

  • can our pictures be ironic?? Because, frankly, we have jack squat here in waayyyy upstate NY (talking almost Montreal upstate)

    πŸ˜›

  • The person on the bike half is wearing roller blades, I believe.

    The entire notion of segregating between bike and ped is a curious one. What if there’s a school group of children on foot, do they need to queue up single file when there are no bicyclists around? Of course not. And when there’s a big bicycle group ride, and nobody on foot? Again, it would be foolish NOT to use the extra asphalt on the right side.

    People that overly-segregate paths tend to have interstate envy. Folks: Bikes are not cars. They can and should move slowly enough that they can negotiate in real-time with other trail users. If you’re moving on your bicycle so fast that you’re not safe to overtake peds travelling the same direction as you: go buy a bell, you Lance Armstrong wannabe! Go on, it won’t kill you to lug a one pound bell on your silly twelve pound racing bike.

  • BicyclesOnly

    I’d say this stretch of pathway is a bit over-engineered. Especially given how under-utilized Wards Island is (this is actually Wards, not Randalls I). I agree with the comment above that the markings are intended (and in practice serve only) to keep those walking slowly toward the right, not to give pedestrians insufficient space to walk. The path design shown here reflects a relatively brief connection between the Randalls-Wards bridge and the much longer facility that runs along the western shore of Wards I. That western shore facility is comprised of two paths–a pedestrian path through a grassy area along the East River, and an inland bike- and skater-only path. Large banks of beautifully selected and cultivated flowers separate the two paths. The grass by the river is as well-maintained as Sheep Meadow. The wildflower plantings almost rival some parts of the Conservatory Garden. There is also a newly-planted herb garden that rivals Wave Hill’s. The waterfront is accessible, and kids can find surprisingly large crabs and other wildlife, and dip their feet in the water. Weeping willows and fruit trees along the shore provide perfect picnic spots. And virtually no one uses these facilities, even in the height of summer, because it is accessible primarily by bike and foot. I hope Larry and other readers will check it out–it’s a pedestrian’s paradise, and one of my most favorite spots in NYC!

  • BicyclesOnly

    John in NH, That’s a great idea, but maybe it should be a separate slide show–Pathetically Bad Infrastructure! I’ve got some contributions!

  • do they need to queue up single file when there are no bicyclists around? Of course not. And when there’s a big bicycle group ride, and nobody on foot? Again, it would be foolish NOT to use the extra asphalt on the right side.watch las-vegas.

  • zach

    Can I sum up the above comments and say perhaps it should be a dotted line?

  • The space allocation is a bit weird if you think only of bikes. Rollerblade skaters need a fair bit more space than a cyclist or a ped. I think it clearly states the path is not shared. There is a lane for PEDS ONLY and a lane for bikes and rollerblade-skaters (which they share).

    If the path-lines are only there for “sometimes” why have them at all?
    If the “sometimes” are for whenever one group thinks there’s less of the other group, why have them at all?
    If it’s a shared path, why have lines at all?

    If the local laws are like my local laws then everyone has to give way to ped’s.

    Mark Walker: a bike wheel with tires is 28″+ in diameter. That’s only 8″ short of a yard. Not ‘pretty far’ at all. Perhaps you could also say why you would find it impossible to walk in that ped lane with arms folded taking baby steps? Apologies if you took insult but I’m just baffled how it could be impossible for someone capable of walking out to a nice park.

  • Not sure why it’s one way – perhaps there’s a reason. In our experience, these facilities work best when they are bi-directional, line divided, and have trail use guidelines and keep right signs posted. Caring cyclists using a bell or audible will rarely have trouble sharing with foot traffic in this arrangement unless it’s simply over crowded. It works well here, and in Manhattan too.

  • First of all, this is why I keep coming back to a blog about infrastructure. Why don’t most people enjoy debates about how lines are striped on scantily used foot/cycle paths?

    On that note, here is my over-analysis of this controversial white line:

    Think about some of the medieval streets in older cities, which are simply not wide enough for separate roadbeds and sidewalks (I have Paris in my mind). They have bollards set up such that there is enough room for an automobile to pass between the two bollards in the middle of the street, leaving about two feet on each side between the bollards and the buildings.

    Are the traffic engineers really only giving pedestrians two feet of space? Of course not! It’s just set up so that when a car rolls through every once in a while, everyone has a default place to step aside to so that there won’t be any inter-modal conflicts.

    Same idea with this type of striping on foot/cycle paths. The idea is that pedestrians should feel free to wander the full width of the path, and when confronted with cycle traffic, that two-foot striped area is a refuge to which the pedestrian can step aside, knowing that there should, at least theoretically, be no bikes in that area.

    And if cycle and foot traffic are so constant that the pedestrian feels consistently squeezed onto that two-foot strip? Well then it’s time to complain to the city about either widening the path, or creating more separated foot and cycle facilities!

  • Paul Johnson

    It would be awesome if we could get sidewalks on our cycleways in Portland…Springwater corridor and the Willamette Greenway have problems where pedestrians forget they’re not the only users of the path…

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