Getting Romantic About Transit

2405948352_ae07cd8ed4.jpgLove at the bus stop. (Photo: lucam via Flickr)

Today on the Streetsblog Network, we came across a sweet post from one of our favorite network members — Seattle’s Carla Saulter, better known as Bus Chick. She’s celebrating a milestone — seven years of living car-free. And she takes the occasion to share some memories:

It’s been an eventful seven years. I bought a home, got married, lost my beloved mother to cancer, and had two children. Navigating so many major life events without a car in a city that all but requires one has certainly had its challenges, but it has also integrated the bus into all of my significant recent memories*–and made it impossible for me to imagine my life without Metro. As I wrote in my Real Change column back in 2006, buses have associations for me.

Riding the Water Taxi reminds me of the days I spent with my mother during her last months of life. The first time I rode it to my parents’ Seacrest Park condo the spring after she died, I cried. Sometimes I still do.

The 545 will forever feel romantic to me, since it’s the route Nerd and I rode together in the early days of our courtship. I don’t think I’ve ever looked more forward to a commute — or for that matter, to anything.

It’s unusual for someone to use the word "romantic" when talking about a bus. But it shouldn’t be. Plenty of people do their courting on buses and trains. And transit often takes us to see our loved ones. Do any of you out there have sentimental associations with particular bus or subway lines? Let us know in the comments.

More from around the network: Cap’n Transit tries to get to the root of Joel Kotkin’s bad attitude. Psystenance asks you to banish the phrase "avid cyclist" from your vocabulary. And Tulsa Alternative Transportation Examiner talks about windshield perspective in Oklahoma.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Having a Kid Doesn’t Mean Having a Car

|
Bus Chick’s "Chicklet" is happy to take public transit. One of our favorite recent discoveries on the national transpo blogging scene is Carla Saulter, a third-generation Seattleite who documents her transit-going life in a blog called Bus Chick for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. A lot of people who do without cars before they become parents think […]

Driven to Distraction in America

|
A couple of weeks ago I left the transit-rich confines of New York City and headed down South to visit family. I made it all the way to Meridian, Mississippi, without getting in a car (I rode the subway to Penn Station and took Amtrak from there), but once I got off the train in […]

A Transit Education in Santa Rosa

|
Introducing students to the awesomeness of bus travel. (Photo: Santa Rosa CityBus) I started riding the public bus to get to school in New York City when I was about nine or ten years old. It was a trip that took half an hour or so each way, including a walk of several blocks from […]

Veering Right: A Cyclist on the Constant Sensation of Being in the Way

|
When she was a kid growing up in Minneapolis, biking was as natural to Alice Avidor as breathing the air. But as time went on, biking went from feeling carefree and empowering to something more like a hostile negotiation. Avidor writes at streets.mn about why she now finds herself veering to the right to avoid inconveniencing drivers: I think the driver that […]

Rising to the Challenge of Bringing Kids on Transit

|
Following up on yesterday’s post about family-friendly transit, which generated a raft of interesting comments on Streetsblog New York (and even more on our SF, DC and LA sites), we’ve got a dispatch from the front lines. Carla Saulter, who writes the always excellent Bus Chick blog out in Seattle, weighs in on how going […]

Will President Obama Speak for the Transit-Starved Tonight?

|
President Obama is expected to make a strong push for infrastructure spending during the State of the Union address tonight. Ahead of the address, the Transportation Equity Network organized its members and supporters to write to President Obama, telling their personal stories of why transit funding is crucial to their communities. In all, TEN will deliver […]