Rounding Up More TIGER Coverage

The Streetsblog Network has been abuzz over the last 24 hours about the TIGER grants that were announced yesterday by the US DOT. Elana had some great roundups on this site yesterday about winners and losers in the highly competitive process.

Yonah Freemark of The Transport Politic posted another good overview. He notes, as Elana did, that the distribution of funds seems to reflect a shift away from car-centric thinking. Freemark adds a caveat, though:

Tucson_Streetcar.jpgThe Tucson Modern Streetcar was among the TIGER winners. (Image: Tucson Regional Transit Authority)

Though the TIGER grant process was supposed to result in the funding of
creative, unique solutions to transportation problems in the United
States, it would be hard to argue that many of the programs chosen for
funding today are particularly different: no money was spent on bike share networks, for instance.

Around the country, our member blogs were posting about what the results meant to their local communities, for good and ill.

KC Light Rail and Let’s Go KC both posted on the awards going to Kansas City, Missouri, which got money for suburban transit and the improvement of conditions for pedestrians in the city’s Green Impact Zone (KC Light Rail wonders if some funds might end up going to the downtown streetcar as well). However, as KCBike.info posted, the region got no funds for bicycling improvements.

The Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia rejoiced in the funding of seven different bicycle/pedestrian projects there.

Santa Rosa CityBus writes that although their TIGER application was turned down, they’ll be getting some of the stimulus funds that BART won’t be getting for the Oakland Airport Connector.

Greater Greater Washington says the D.C. region’s money will mean a real boost for bus service.

And Bike Portland reports that TIGER money will mean a two-way cycle track in that city.

Got some TIGER news that you’re particularly excited or disappointed about? Hit us in the comments.

  • My personal opinion: the bike sharing projects likely didn’t create enough jobs compared to the infrastructure projects.

    In awesome news though, many projects will fund or support complete streets networks in cities/regions as diverse as Philadelphia, Dubuque, Tulsa, and Portland. Full scoop from the complete streets standpoint here: http://www.completestreets.org/policy/federal/tiger-awards-many-complete-streets-projects/

  • Steve Davis

    The “creative, unique solutions” that Yonah cited weren’t really a part of the official criteria. That said, it should be telling that more than half of the money went to entities other than state DOTs, giving cities and localities direct control of transportation decisions. Doing this sort of innovative work is typically so difficult that it just doesn’t get funded under the conventional federal transportation programs.

    As Mayor Smith said in our official release, “The sheer popularity of this ground-breaking approach is testament to how many states and localities are struggling to build innovative projects that simply don’t happen under the pre-existing program.”

    http://t4america.org/pressers/2010/02/17/tiger-grants-offer-critical-support-to-communities-with-innovative-transportation-projects/

    Or as Reconnecting America pointed out, getting that same funding for Tucson or other streetcar projects through New Starts could have taken decades.

    More TIGER money in the jobs bill, please.

  • TIGER, TIGER everywhere, but with transit and high speed rail stealing the show, the bike and pedestrian projects aren’t getting the attention they deserve. Thanks to America Bikes for providing the list.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

TIGER’s Love Affair With Freight — And Bikes

|
This article is the second of a two-part series about how U.S. DOT’s Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery program — TIGER, a discretionary grant program that got its start under the Recovery Act in 2009 — has made transportation planning more strategic, based on a benefit-cost analysis and national goals. Read the first part here, about […]

Who Lost Out in the Bid for a Piece of TIGER Transportation Stimulus?

|
With more than $56 billion in applications submitted for just $1.5 billion in available funding, the Obama administration’s TIGER grants — short for Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery — was one of the stimulus law’s most hotly contested programs. So it’s no surprise that the process resulted in its share of losers as well as […]

GOP Appropriations Bill Would Turn TIGER Into a Roads Program

|
As the president’s transportation proposal fades from the news cycle and we eagerly await the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee’s six-year reauthorization bill, here comes the House Republicans’ proposed budget for transportation and housing for next year. Note: What the House GOP released yesterday wasn’t an authorization bill but an appropriations bill for 2015. […]

TIGER III Requests Exceed Available Funding 27 to 1

|
In its third incarnation, USDOT’s TIGER program continues to be overwhelmingly popular. The deadline to apply for TIGER III grants passed late last month, but not before 828 applications were received from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and US territories. Applications for this $527 million program totaled $14.1 billion, guaranteeing the selection process […]