Friday’s Headlines Have Their Fingers Crossed

  • An upcoming Supreme Court case will decide whether the EPA even has the power to restrict greenhouse gas emissions. (Vox)
  • The problem with Big Tech’s vision of a future filled with autonomous vehicles is that it takes car dependency as a given when ordinary public transit is safer, cheaper and more efficient. (Fast Company)
  • The updated Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices inexplicably left out many ideas for making streets safer. (The Urbanist)
  • A conservative think tank is advancing the argument that more gas and oil production is good, actually, because the alternative is to burn even dirtier coal. (Washington Post)
  • Consolidation and competition from freight and buses, and later cars, killed off L.A.’s streetcar system, once the grandest in the country. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The Memphis Area Transit Authority is testing a new streetcar on a trolley line that last ran in 2014. (WREG)
  • Clayton County officials approved plans for a bus rapid transit line through the Atlanta suburb. (AJC)
  • San Diego labor and environmental groups are gathering signatures to put a sales tax hike for transportation on the ballot in 2022. (Voice of San Diego)
  • A proposal for a monorail linking Miami Beach with the mainland barely snuck through a citizens’ transportation panel. (Miami Today)
  • Portland should not go along with plans for a 12-lane I-5 bridge over the Columbia River (City Observatory).
  • A new bike- and bus-only lane in Madison has cleared up a confusing bottlenecks, although bikes and buses must share a lane in one direction while buses run in traffic in the other because the city wouldn’t remove parking. (Wisconsin State Journal)
  • Kentucky christened a 265-mile bike trail, but unfortunately it appears to be little more than signage along two-lane country roads. (WLKY)
  • If you ignore all of Qatar’s human rights abuses, as CNN Travel did, the new metro it’s building for the 2022 World Cup could be the future of transit.

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Cyclists Take Black Hawk Bike-Ban Case to Colorado Supreme Court

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Of all the places we’ve criticized for antagonistic treatment of cyclists, Black Hawk, Colorado stands alone. This tiny town of just 118 has taken intolerance of people on bikes to its logical conclusion: an outright ban on cycling. The legal battle began last summer, when three cyclists were ticketed for riding through town. Since then, […]