Monday’s Headlines to Start Your Week

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has scheduled a Thursday vote on the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. (New York Times)
  • Investing in transit and lowering emissions should be priorities during the COVID-19 recovery. (The Hill)
  • Federal workers make up almost half of the D.C. Metro’s ridership, and if they don’t start commuting to the office again, the transit agency will have to find a way to make up for the lost revenue. (Washington Post)
  • Even if voters approve a new sales tax, Hillsborough County, Florida, will still have a nearly billion-dollar shortfall to meet its transportation needs. (Tampa Bay Times)
  • Pittsburgh’s new 50-year transportation plan encourages transit, walking, biking and shared rides, but also has some pie-in-the-sky stuff in it like hyperloops and flying taxis. (Transport Topics)
  • Milwaukee’s city council president wants to split the public works department in two, with a transportation department focusing on making streets safer. (Urban Milwaukee)
  • Sound Transit’s CEO will be departing soon after the Seattle agency’s board voted not to renew his contract. (Seattle Times)
  • A new group will work to prevent displacement along Minneapolis’ Blue Line extension. (Railway Age)
  • Detroit’s QLine streetcar resumes regular service today, and is now fare-free (Click On Detroit). The University of Arizona’s Sun Link streetcar is currently free but might start collecting fares again next year (Daily Wildcat). A fare hike is also in store for Charlotte’s free streetcar (WSOC).
  • A Green Party mayor in Germany wants to discourage driving by drastically raising parking rates, especially for heavier vehicles. (The Guardian)
  • Raptors basketball star Pascal Siakam rode the Toronto streetcar for the first time. (Daily Hive)

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