Thursday’s Headlines Are Catching Up

  • Amtrak has been neglected for so long that its $66 billion in the infrastructure bill will mostly just bring intercity rail back up to speed, rather than build an Asian- or European-style system. (CNN)
  • The fact that interstate highways tore through urban Black neighborhoods wasn’t an accident. That was the plan all along. (Washington Post)
  • The majority of transit riders are women, yet transit systems throw up a variety of roadblocks, from sexual harassment to stroller bans to scheduling that doesn’t meet caregivers’ needs. (Ms. Magazine)
  • Urban rail stations were once vibrant community centers, and they can be again. (Mass Transit Mag)
  • The solo rush-hour commute might seem like a permanent fact of American life, but it is not. (Governing)
  • Uber, Lyft and other gig-economy companies are taking their successful anti-labor Prop 22 campaign to states outside California. (Jacobin)
  • Insurance is a rarely considered cost of owning a car, and it runs the average driver $1,800 a year. Detroit is by far the most expensive city to insure a car. (City Observatory)
  • New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy wants Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg to referee a dispute among New Jersey, New York and Connecticut over COVID funding for transit. (Trains)
  • A proposed Colorado DOT rule would require state and local governments to consider the impact on climate change when approving road projects. (Colorado Public Radio)
  • The North Carolina Supreme Court ruled that records from a private but state-owned railroad company related to the failed Durham-Orange light rail line aren’t subject to open records. (Raleigh News & Observer)
  • Vancouver could beat New York to become the first North American city to try congestion pricing. (National Observer)
  • Prague’s first cargo-bike depot has been so successful at reducing carbon emissions that the Czech city is opening a second one. (Eltis)

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Passenger Rail Isn’t Just for “Rail Buffs”

|
I just returned from an overnight train trip on Amtrak a couple of days ago, riding the Crescent from Meridian, Mississippi, into Penn Station, after completing the southbound trip a week earlier. It’s a route I’ve traveled before, one of dozens of long-distance hauls I’ve made on Amtrak over the last 20 or so years. […]

Missing the Point on High-Speed Rail

|
Ed Glaeser is a fantastic economist. He has done magnificent work analyzing the economics of urban growth and written indispensable papers on the connection between housing regulations and migration. But when the man picks up his pen to write a piece for public consumption, he tends to take complete leave of his senses. I realize […]

House and Senate Agree on $2.5B for High-Speed Rail — And More

|
After lengthy negotiations, the House and Senate agreed last night on a massive "omnibus" spending bill [PDF] that includes $2.5 billion for high-speed rail — a compromise between the two chambers — as well as $150 million for the Obama administration’s sustainable communities effort and $150 million for the Washington D.C. Metro system. Rep. John […]

Final Stimulus Bill Slaps Transit Riders in the Face

|
The final tally is in, and we now have a breakdown for transportation funding in the stimulus bill that President Obama will sign, barring some unforeseen turn of the screw. Via Transportation for America: $29 billion for highways and bridges $8.4 billion for transit $8 billion for high-speed rail $1.3 billion for Amtrak To compare […]