Friday’s Headlines to End a Long Week

  • Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao announced her resignation Thursday, citing the “traumatic” riot by Trump supporters at the U.S. Capitol. But some said she should stay on and help use the Cabinet’s power under the 25th Amendment to remove the president (Politico). Meanwhile, Streetsblog said good riddance.
  • The Biden Administration should help cities like New Orleans tear down urban freeways that are a legacy of racist planning. (Fast Company)
  • When cities moved quickly to implement slow streets during the pandemic, it often created resentment among underrepresented groups that planners didn’t consult. (City Lab)
  • People aren’t ditching their cars when Uber and Lyft come to town — in fact, registrations actually rise nearly 1 percent. (Green Car Congress)
  • New York desperately needs more bike parking due to an uptick in cycling during the pandemic. The city has one spot for every 16 bikes but 1.5 free spaces for every car (City Limits, Streetsblog NYC). The problem isn’t limited to New York, either (Next City).
  • Drivers killed 54 people in Portland last year, the highest number since 1996 (The Oregonian)
  • In Pittsburgh, where transit ridership has dropped 70 percent during the pandemic, the Port Authority is pushing to let low-income people ride for free. Advocates also want to reroute buses and trolleys from wealthier neighborhoods to poorer ones. (Public Source)
  • A second round of layoffs at Denver’s Regional Transportation District brings the total cuts to nearly 400 jobs. (CBS 4)
  • A Phoenix neighborhood group wants to take over public sidewalks so it can stop homeless people from sleeping there. (New Times)
  • Madison will require electric vehicle chargers in new parking lots. (Wisconsin State Journal)
  • Vancouver is creating “green zones” where hybrid buses will shut off their diesel engines to cut emissions. (The Reflector)
  • China opened 20 new light-rail lines in a week. (International Railway Journal)

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