Wednesday’s Headlines Will Make You Hungry for More

  • Building bike lanes can help build more equitable cities. (The Conversation)
  • The slow-streets movement is popular in affluent neighborhoods where many residents work from home, but residents of lower-income neighborhoods (who still have to go to work) prefer devoting street space to initiatives like outdoor dining that support businesses. (Government Technology)
  • Uber and Lyft have long planned a nationwide rollout of their Prop 22 strategy in California to beat back regulations on drivers’ labor rights. (CNET)
  • GM is switching sides and no longer backs the Trump administration’s effort to block California from raising emissions standards (Reuters). As Jalopnik points out, this is not exactly a profile in courage, since several automakers already cut a deal with California, and it now appears that others are trying to curry favor with the incoming Biden administration.
  • Atlanta’s iconic Peachtree Street, like much of the city, is not very inviting for pedestrians. A proposed redesign would reduce car lanes to carve out more space for bikes and sidewalks. (AJC)
  • Now that voters approved it, the step in implementing Austin’s Project Connect transit plan is creating a new transit board. (KVUE)
  • Chicago is experiencing a rash of bike thefts during the pandemic. (Sun-Times)
  • Testing autonomous vehicles in California is nothing new, but now the state is allowing robo-taxi companies to pick up fares for profit. (The Verge)
  • A group of St. Paul teenagers is trying to convince Metro Transit to allow bigger dogs on trains. (Star Tribune)
  • Sadly, Cob the turkey will never fulfill his dream of biking across Iowa, as President Trump pardoned another turkey, Corn, instead. (Politico)

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