Tuesday’s Headlines

  • Paging Mayor Bowser: Dave Salovesh’s ghost bike was, yes, run over by a car driver over the weekend. (Curbed)
  • Bikes contributed to the suffrage movement at the turn of the 20th century by giving women freedom of movement and confidence, and even changing fashion. Today, there’s a renewed push to convince planners to consider the way women live and move around cities on bikes. (Curbed)
  • Every community has different needs, so Complete Streets policies shouldn’t be one-size-fits-all. (Smart Cities Dive)
  • Outlawing distracted walking doesn’t make pedestrians safer and will probably lead to racial profiling (City Lab). An incident in Florida last week where a police officer handcuffed an searched a black teen who was crossing the street proves the point (Tampa Bay Times).
  • Washington, D.C.-area residents oppose congestion pricing by a two-to-one margin (Washington Post). That’s not surprising — but it also doesn’t mean that it’s a bad idea.
  • A University of San Francisco report suggests making transit service free to better compete with Uber and Lyft. (Examiner)
  • Seattle’s DOT director says parking is an inefficient use of public space, and if the city builds more bike lanes, cyclists will come (KTTH). Meanwhile, the Seattle Times raises four questions about scooters.
  • Two years after Denver launched a Vision Zero plan, the city is falling short of its goals. (Colorado Public Radio)
  • Madison, Wisc. is betting on bus rapid transit to help cope with congestion that will come with rapid growth. (State Journal)
  • The Omaha World-Herald gets onboard with stronger transit.
  • Phoenix officials are pivoting to crafting an e-scooter policy after no one was interested in bringing dockless bikes to the city (Arizona Republic). But Zagster is starting a bike-share in Montgomery, Ala. (Advertiser).
  • An Anchorage resident who uses a wheelchair because of injuries suffered in car wrecks is lobbying for a better handicapped-accessible transit system. (KTUU)
  • A Chicago reporter documented her 30-mile bike commute on National Bike to Work Day last week. (Tribune)
  • The party started at 5:30 a.m. at Uber’s San Francisco headquarters the day the company went public (Business Insider). La-di-da.

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