Today’s Headlines

  • As Feds Dawdle on Transit Benefit, NYC Could Go It Alone (WNYC)
  • Transit Fares Rise Across the Nation (Roll Call)
  • Five Things U.S. Transit Could Learn From London: #1 Annual Fare Hikes (CityLab)
  • This Weekend, Gas Prices Will Incentivize Smarter Transportation Decisions (Baltimore Sun)
  • Why Travel Time Comparisons Between MBTA and Bridj Are Misleading (Human Transit)
  • The Silver Line: Myths and Facts (WaPo)
  • The Findings From This Pew Report Have Ceased to Surprise Anyone (WaPo)
  • Uber and Lyft Under Fire for Not Serving People With Disabilities (Next City)
  • Kevin Love

    What the Next City author fails to realize is that Uber and Lyft are peer-to-peer services.

    What this means in the context of disabled users is that these services can match up disabled people willing to offer rides to other disabled people who need them. Since many disabled people have vehicles modified for their own use, their peers are people with similar disabilities who require similar modifications.

    This is tremendously useful, since who can best understand and empathize with the needs of a disabled person than one of their peers with similar needs.

    That is the tremendous power of peer-to-peer services.

  • C Monroe

    Also this might be a niche market for those who would like to cater to those with disabilities. It might be slightly more than an average Uber/Lyft, Taxi ride but these drivers would be more adapted to handle those with disabilities. It would still be cheaper than other disability van services(some are $50-75 dollars a trip) and faster with less lead times than public disability bus service(many take a 24 hour notice). Yes basic Taxi or ride share service might not be able to handle those with disabilities but there are some who would cater to this.