Today’s Headlines

  • Previewing tonight’s "Blueprint America" episode on the path Detroit must take to build a future apart from the auto industry; check it out on PBS at 10pm (NYT)
  • Dallas looking ahead to the transportation challenges it will face while hosting Super Bowl 2011 (Morn News)
  • A new study from the Economic Policy Institute finds that Transportation for America’s proposed transport stimulus would create 480,000 direct jobs (EDF Press)
  • Denver’s FasTrax transit master plan gets a $300m boost from Washington (D. Post)
  • In Seattle, one councilman envisions new elevated light rail running alongside I-405 (S. Times)
  • LaHood concerned that rising use of in-car technology could be exacerbating driver distraction (Autoblog)
  • As Congress gears up its investigation of the company’s recall debacle, Toyota’s troubles are just beginning (AP)

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Transportation for America Releases Blueprint for Transportation Reform

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Today Transportation for America is releasing a 100-page document called "The Route to Reform," in which they outline policy recommendations related to the upcoming reauthorization of federal transportation funding legislation (download the executive summary here or the full report here).  From the executive summary:  The next transportation program must set about the urgent task of […]

Talking Headways Podcast: Pro·pin·qui·ty

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