The Black Car Project: Filling the Autovoid

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Thinking of getting rid of your car? You could sell it, but that means somebody else is eventually going to drive it on our city’s streets, contributing to air pollution and congestion. The Black Car Collective has a better idea: entomb it in black stucco.

The idea is instead of a functional art car we want a non-functional car that is a statement on global warming to pop up in parking lots across the country. The car can be stuccoed and painted black, it could also be turned into a garden or be the bottom of a wind turbine. The only request we make is that it is created in the spirit of the original piece, that the car is someone’s personal vehicle, and that it is given up with the pledge of not owning another vehicle until they are sustainable: if that ever happens. We also would like you to promote the piece actively and encourage others to create their own.

Could be a nice project for those homesick suburban transplants once they lose their taste for auto dependence.

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