The Idea of Rising Sea Levels is Sinking In

Some light reading from the Christian Science Monitor before tomorrow’s rumored Office of Long-Term Planning & Sustainability conference:

The city’s Department of Environmental Protection, which manages the city’s freshwater supply and wastewater — 13,000 miles of pipe, total — formed a task force to look at the long-term effects of climate change. Among other things, the DEP was concerned by the damage storm surges might inflict on a city surrounded by water. Although city officials declined to discuss concrete solutions for this article saying they were still in the "assessment" phase, scientists foresee potential fixes ranging from raising key infrastructure and building dikes, to flood gates and temporary seals over tunnel entrances. One group proposes raisable flood barriers large enough to protect all of Manhattan Island.

And the winner of a recent competition for engineers and architects to envision New York City in 2106, ARO, doesn’t attempt to keep the water out. Rather, they envision building in, on and around it.

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