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  1.  

    RichardC

    Buried highways through dense cities are better than highways above ground, but they still induce auto demand into downtown areas and feed high volumes of traffic onto local streets. Also, even if everything goes according to plan they’re still tremendously expensive. Spending those billions reduces the funding available for transit and other multimodal projects.

  2.  

    thielges

    Tunnels are often a great option to have when routing travel through a built-up city. That goes for mass transit as well as ordinary highways like Hwy-99 in Seattle.

    The big difference is that rail tunnels can be significantly smaller compared to road tunnels since they don’t need nearly as much width for multiple lanes. The volume of the tunnel is related to the square of the roadbed width. Road tunnels generally need to be at least 2 lanes wide to provide for a breakdown lane. Rail tunnels can be as narrow as a single track for most of the distance.

    This makes me wonder whether tunnels are a viable option for high volume rail transit but not for high volume highways. Basic geometry and physics cannot be ignored.

  3.  

    theqin

    Maybe they can just turn the already dug out section into some sort of awesome underground night space with food stands and night clubs and other things that produce noise but are nice features of cities that no one wants to hear from their apartment.

  4.  

    Joe R.

    This project may be a boondoggle but nevertheless the concept of burying highways in urban areas is a good one. Remember, the principal objection to urban highways is that they’re eyesores and cut neighborhoods in half. A highway in a tunnel is none of those things. The principal downside is cost, but perhaps if we built enough highways in tunnels the cost would drop as we acquired engineering knowledge.

  5.  

    Mike B

    The cut & cover tunnel would still cost us another $3 billion, which we already spent on the deep bored tunnel (DBT). Additionally, the impacts to the city and waterfront would be incredible compared to the DBT. A drilled tube is exactly what the DBT is, so we’re not even going to think about another drilled tube big enough for a roadway.

    Anti-tunnel people were harping on the soil conditions, highway, traffic forecasts, accessibility, cost, potential for overruns and overall risk. Fancy that, they ended up being right on all of them

    A pipe was one of many things that may have contributed to the machine’s breakdown. They were having issues prior to hitting the pipe, including clogged cutter head openings, overheating, and clogs in the mixing chamber behind the cutter head.

    I live in Seattle, BTW.

  6.  

    douglasawillinger

    They could revive a waterfront cut and cover tunnel combined with a new seawall- which was rejected in part to that requiring that the viaduct be closed for the construction period. Perhaps make it 2×4 lanes with provisions for a drilled tube to divert some traffic from I-5.

    The anti tunnel people were taken as gadflies for harping on the fact that it was a highway tunnel, rather than any engineering-soil conditions arguments.

    Indeed could not this article discussed some of the engineering details? Was not it a pipe that was deleted from a data base which subsequently tore the gasket protecting the TBM’s bearings?

    http://cos-mobile.blogspot.com/2015/01/bertha-sabotaged.html

  7.  

    Scott Bonjukian

    Meanwhile, a local group wants to preserve the viaduct for a park: https://northwesturbanist.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/the-alaskan-way-viaduct-must-come-down/

  8.  

    حسام داود

  9.  

    حسام داود

  10.  

    Matt Korner

    Streetscape Improvements for Historic Route 66 in San Bernardino

  11.  

    Matt Korner

    Streetscape Improvements for Historic Route 66 in San Bernardino

  12.  

    Matt Korner

    Streetscape Improvements for Historic Route 66 in San Bernardino

  13.  

    Matt Korner

    Streetscape Improvements for Historic Route 66 in San Bernardino

  14.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center by AECOM

  15.  

    Matt Korner

    Overview of San Bernardino’s Re-conceived City Center

  16.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center by AECOM

  17.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center

  18.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center

  19.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center

  20.  

    Matt Korner

    Crafting Special Places with a Granular Urbanism in San Bernardino’s City Center

  21.  

    Matt Korner

    Proposed Re-establishment of Third Street in the Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center by AECOM

  22.  

    Matt Korner

    Vision & Action Plan for San Bernardino’s City Center by AECOM

  23.  

    Matt Korner

    San Bernardino’s Entire City Center Pedestrianized for the Annual Route 66 Rendez-vous®: The Great Celebration of America’s Mother Road™ (Served by the sbX Station at Court Street)

  24.  

    Matt Korner

    San Bernardino’s Entire City Center Pedestrianized for the Annual Route 66 Rendez-vous®: The Great Celebration of America’s Mother Road™ (Served by the sbX Station at Court Street)

  25.  

    Matt Korner

    San Bernardino’s Entire City Center Pedestrianized for the Annual Route 66 Rendez-vous®: The Great Celebration of America’s Mother Road™ (Served by the sbX Station at Court Street)

  26.  

    Matt Korner

    San Bernardino’s Entire City Center Pedestrianized for the Annual Route 66 Rendez-vous®: The Great Celebration of America’s Mother Road™ (Served by the sbX Station at Court Street)

  27.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  28.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  29.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  30.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  31.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  32.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Single-Family Residential Neighborhoods in San Bernardino that Have Been Preserved by the New Transit-Oriented Development (T.O.D.) Ordinance

  33.  

    Matt Korner

    Permanent Collection of Egyptian Antiquities at the Fullerton (Served by the sbX Station at University Parkway in San Bernardino)

  34.  

    Andy B from Jersey

    The story of the death of Brandon Majewski is horrifically tragic but the 17yo and his friends were riding bikes on a rural road with NO LIGHTS and few reflectors. 17 is old enough to operate a car in most states and provinces so he should have known the rules of the road. If the car driver had been driving with no lights Streetsblog would have been calling for her head.

  35.  

    Matt Korner

    “Red Carpet” Forecourt for the California Theatre

  36.  

    Matt Korner

    Upgraded Softscape, Paving, Street Furniture, and Curb Extensions in San Bernardino’s City Center

  37.  

    Matt Korner

    Streetscape Improvements in San Bernardino’s City Center

  38.  

    Matt Korner

    Proposed Road Diet along Fourth Street

  39.  

    Matt Korner

    Existing Street Wall along Fourth Street before the Proposed Road Diet

  40.  

    Matt Korner

    Proposed Road Diet for Fourth Street

  41.  

    Matt Korner

    Theatre Square as the Beachhead for the Revitalization of San Bernardino’s City Center

  42.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square

  43.  

    Matt Korner

    Adaptive Reuse of the Woolworth Building across the Street from Theatre Square

  44.  

    Matt Korner

    Theatre Square and Surrounding Nightlife

  45.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)

  46.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)

  47.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)

  48.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)

  49.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)

  50.  

    Matt Korner

    Study Model for Theatre Square (within the Pedestrian Shed of the sbX Station at Court Street)